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Ashley Davis

1005

Bold Points

1x

Nominee

2x

Finalist

Bio

Hello, My name is Ashley Davis and I am a student at New Kent Highschool. I am committed to VCU and planning to attend in fall 2023. My plans for majoring is communication arts and psychology. Some of my hobbies are art, music, and writing.

Education

Virginia Commonwealth University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2024
  • Majors:
    • Film/Video and Photographic Arts

New Kent High School

High School
2019 - 2023

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Film/Video and Photographic Arts
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Arts

    • Dream career goals:

    • Present
    • Present
    • Present

    Sports

    Marching Band

    Club
    Present

    Research

    • Communication, General

      Present

    Arts

    • Performance Art
      Present
    • Visual Arts
      Present
    • Music
      Present
    • Drawing
      Present
    • Illustration
      Present

    Public services

    • Public Service (Politics)

      Present

    Future Interests

    Politics

    Entrepreneurship

    Hilda Klinger Memorial Scholarship
    In kindergarten, I put on a piece of paper "I want to be an artist when I grow up." It was hidden in a shoe box full of memories in a time capsule labeled "Do not open until your high school graduation." It was full of little drawings of my friends, family, and even self-portraits. I was allowed to freely express everything I wanted with no judgment from others or even myself. Being a young artist releases you from other people's perception and you do everything you want without regard for other people and what they would like. Looking back at this I felt very proud of the person I had become. Living and manifesting the dream I had for 12 years. Going to college for the very thing I was craving at such a young age. Growing up I had a lot of support from my family. They looked at all my drawing good or mostly bad and cheered me on. If it wasn't for them this dream and passion would have been left on that very piece of paper. I would show them all my "masterpieces" as if they had just gone to the MET. As I have grown more into my art style and continued to dream big their supportive cheers turned into actual love for my work. Except for just my parents supporting me, it turned into my friends and teachers. My middle school art teacher introduced me to an artist named Kehinde Wiley. He painted young black men and women and portrayed them in Renaissance paintings. highlighting them in positions of power and giving them a voice. This intrigued me and even to this day, this is my favorite artist. My art transformed into more political and social commentary. Highlighting the problems in our country and trying to spread awareness of the topic. Seeing his work really allowed me to see that this was something that could be done and done very well. The idea of having a platform for my work in galleries, and shows, and having my art in museums is something I have longed for. I feel like in this life you have to embrace the passions you have. Work with them and around them to force them into your everyday lives. Never do a job for the money but for your own personal pleasure. That is how I feel about art and it will always be apart of my life. To little me you are achieving your dream more and more everyday. Keep working hard, I love you.
    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    In the future I see myself being an art activist. Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Since my diversity is sometimes frowned upon, I have to speak with a different tone of voice. Having art with me for the ride of my life has helped me get a point across without having a debate or arguing with others. Showing the different sides of a story that can be digested by all parties viewing. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Art is something that helps me cope, think, relax, and release stress. With the help of this scholarship, I can finally get into the school of my dreams with no loans while also being a full-time artist. Doing so will make me realize that even through all of my struggles I can meet and exceed my goals.
    Xavier M. Monroe Heart of Gold Memorial Scholarship
    A failure that really impacted me was back in my 7th-grade art class. I was sitting with all my friends while playing a game the teacher had assigned, the game was Pictionary. My job was to draw an alligator and to get all the other students to guess what it was. I wasn't the best artist and knew this before I even picked up the pencil but I was still confident. Once I started drawing the whole class erupted in laughter and my best friend at the time said "I bet you wouldn't even be able to draw a tree right." At that moment I was shocked and confused. Wondering how I could be so bad at something I loved so much. Drawing gave me an outlet to explore and be creative but all of that was being shut down by the second and I just wanted to give up. So I finished the game that day and thought maybe I should draw more instead of quitting. Hearing those words made me want to be the best artist I could be. So from that day forward, I drew every day with no fail. While at home I created cartoon characters, drew my friends and family, and was able to imagine things and put them on paper for the world to see. Even after middle school, this continued for me. My art improved every time I put something on the page just to prove all my friends wrong. As I continued to create during my high school years it went from cartoon characters to figures, Family members to political leaders, and societal impacts on the community. As my mind and body started to grow so did my art which led me to a path of activism and leadership. My art created a platform for me to express my ideals and everything I cared about. For me, Activism and art are entwined. My art seeks validation from the mind to keep going. Everything I have done as far as protests, marches, art galleries, and shows has been because of that one moment in middle school. I am going to VCUARTS in the fall because of the statement "You couldn't even draw a tree right." This realization wasn't something that I realized until this prompt and it teaches me that hard work and dedication pay off when you are doing something you love. Never stop your passions too soon and always follow your path! So the next time someone tells you, you can't. Tell them because of you, I can.
    Lillian's & Ruby's Way Scholarship
    In order to tell you a complete vision and story about myself. I have to first start with my identity and who I am as a human being on this planet. I am a Black Afab Lesbian Person who grew up in rural Virginia in mainly white schools. This already set me apart from the average student in my school. I was often asked, "Why does your hair feel like a sponge?" and "Why can't I see you in the dark?" All of these microaggressions formulated and forced me to conform with the other students in my class. Doing so stripped me of my identity and only being in the 3rd grade it made me feel excluded even though the goal was inclusion. Something that always helped me cope with these situations was my artwork. I needed my art in order to express myself freely in a climate that wasn't so free. I would stay up for hours and just draw little cartoon characters. That slowly evolved into filling many sketchbooks with portraits and painting clay sculptures. My parents supported me every step of the way paving a way for me to continue what I was passionate about. As I got to become a little older and came up to the end of middle school. I came out as a lesbian. This part of me was something I had struggled with since I first started doodling in my sketchbooks in elementary school. Being black in a white town was something that already crept up on me every second of the day so this new minority status wasn't helping me at all. I realized what family members were actually family. Losing some of my extended family members from this announcement probably should have been hard on me but it was actually a wake-up call. Allowing me to finally be me and to let anyone go that didn't truly accept me. As I thought more about these subjects I finally got a set of ideas and beliefs. I got more into politics and understood what was going on in my various communities. This let me take my passion for art and turn it into a political outlet for my ideals and beliefs. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. This is how I will serve my community throughout the years and continue to help my people!
    Ruth Hazel Scruggs King Scholarship
    In order to tell you a complete vision and story about myself. I have to first start with my identity and who I am as a human being on this planet. I am a Black Afab Lesbian Person who grew up in rural Virginia in mainly white schools. This already set me apart from the average student in my school. I was often asked, "Why does your hair feel like a sponge?" and "Why can't I see you in the dark?" All of these microaggressions formulated and forced me to conform with the other students in my class. Doing so stripped me of my identity and only being in the 3rd grade it made me feel excluded even though the goal was inclusion. Something that always helped me cope with these situations was my artwork. I needed my art in order to express myself freely in a climate that wasn't so free. I would stay up for hours and just draw little cartoon characters. That slowly evolved into filling many sketchbooks with portraits and painting clay sculptures. My parents supported me every step of the way paving a way for me to continue what I was passionate about. As I got to become a little older and came up to the end of middle school. I came out as a lesbian. This part of me was something I had struggled with since I first started doodling in my sketchbooks in elementary school. Being black in a white town was something that already crept up on me every second of the day so this new minority status wasn't helping me at all. I realized what family members were actually family. Losing some of my extended family members from this announcement probably should have been hard on me but it was actually a wake-up call. Allowing me to finally be me and to let anyone go that didn't truly accept me. As I thought more about these subjects I finally got a set of ideas and beliefs. I got more into politics and understood what was going on in my various communities. This let me take my passion for art and turn it into a political outlet for my ideals and beliefs. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. This is how I will serve my community throughout the years and continue to help my people!
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    The person who can hold a room still with just one stroke of a paintbrush.
    Anthony McPherson Memorial Automotive Scholarship
    In order to really think about this we need to know the real perpetrators of DUIs. Come to find out it is young adults under the age of 30. This is mostly caused by underage drinking and college parties. Peer pressure and social setting are probably other reasons why this is so prevalent in young adults. I think in order to prevent this we have to get into the minds of these young people. You have to understand what can get them to change and love the idea of doing so. This means getting on social media platforms, fun contests, and more. By doing this we have an interactive way of helping out the community and keeping them sober on the road. These posts can be educational short films, TikTok, artwork, and more. Just by using an engaging medium, you can get people to really understand their actions and how this can affect not only their lives but so many others. This is something I am passionate about because my dad's ex-girlfriend had a very bad problem with drinking. She would come to his apartment with me there and hit on him repeatedly. Experiencing this firsthand made me realize that drinking isn't for me and that drinking can make you do crazy things.
    McClendon Leadership Award
    Leadership means friendship but also authority. It means compassion but also control. Leadership is something that you can be taught and learn over time. It's all about learning the balance of love and respect for everyone you are leading. Slowly gain their love so you can have fun together but also their respect so they can listen and let you lead them in the right direction. Leadership has been something that has been in my life for a long time. Being the youngest out of three siblings I should know a lot about the abuse of leadership. Giving the reigns to someone who is hungry for power like a 13-year-old older brother who thinks he can do anything because "mom put him in charge" was crazy for me to understand. One minute you are my brother the next you are acting like my parent. Abusing power isn't only for teenage boys though you can see it a lot at work, in your home environment, and maybe even in yourself. Ever since I first started school you get exposed to how you act in the presence of leadership. You know like being the line leader and leading the clean-up for your class. These are small things but they help you learn what being a leader actually is. However, In Highschool I was put into many leadership positions. The Woodwind Captain for my Marching Band, Vice President of the Senior Class, President of the Diversity Club, Prop Manager, etc. All of these leadership positions made me feel empowered. These weren't just randomly handed in, they were from my years of experience with a certain topic or thing. These have taught me three important things about Leadership. Patience, balance, and Knowledge. These are the three important things in leading anyone and anything. I need to slow down and work at their speed. This is what I learned from the Marching band. You need to teach in order to be followed. The Balance of Friendship and Authority is key to understanding your mission as a group. I learned this from being the Vice President of the Senior Class. And Lastly, Knowledge is essential for the group to understand why they need to respect and follow you. I learned this from being Prop Manger for Threate. Leadership is all about love and connection; respect, and passion. The balance of how we act and controlling human impulses of selfishness. Leadership is one of the most important things in this world. Please learn to lead the right way.
    DV Awareness Scholarship in Memory of Teresa Cox, Rhonda Cox and Jimmie Neal
    When I think of Domestic Violence I think of my own family. My sister has dealt with domestic violence from a former boyfriend of hers. She was with him for several months and treated her exactly how she wanted to be treated in the beginning. Over time he started to show his true colors. He would decline her calls, stay out all night, and start arguing with her more. Around the 6th month of their being together is when the physical abuse started. He would choke, punch, and slap her anytime she made him angry or slightly bit irritated. During this time I had no idea this was going on. To the outside world, their relationship was something to desire. Something you would never have but want so badly, but as they say "The grass is always greener on the other side." Once we started getting calls from my sister screaming and crying saying that he took her keys and is threatening her if she tries to leave her own house that's when I knew it was serious. This phone call happened two more times before she finally broke up with him. And by break up with, I mean he was in a jail cell. A couple of weeks later she found out she was pregnant with his baby. Being a 23-year-old with a child of her own already and the dad of her expected child being her abuser she made the decision to abort the baby. One of the hardest decisions a mother could make. I was right there with her, being 16 years old myself I was concerned, confused, and corned with the information I had never seen with my own eyes. After this moment in time, I have been more passionate and outspoken with my thoughts and feelings on this topic. My outlet is through the arts. I have been in the arts including Music and Visual arts all of my life but starting in high school I use it as an activist platform. I draw what I feel and show others the perspective of the oppressed and silenced. I want to give minorities and the disadvantaged a platform to speak out on what they believe in and how the world needs to be changed. A pretty painting or drawing can draw a viewer in and help them learn more information than reading a 5-page essay on the topic. This issue means a lot to me and my family and I will continue to use my platform and my voice to speak out for the underdog.
    Grace Lynn Ross Memorial Scholarship
    "Okay class so today we will talk about serial killers!" Was a statement that made my eyes light up. Now you might be wondering why that is but I feel like I was always destined to go down this path of enlightenment. From the shows I watched to the people I talked to, I was always interested in the mind and how it works, including the mind of criminals. Ever since I was in middle school I would watch true crime documentaries. Wondering why and how someone would go and commit these heinous acts on other human beings. So when I started taking AP Psychology I knew this was the career for me. Taking AP Psychology in my Junior year of High school, was the hardest but also the most interesting class I have ever taken. It made me rethink all of my life choices because of all the notes I had to take and the information I was learning. During this class, I was challenged with the task of understanding human behavior and how the brain works. Going into how to condition someone and predicting someone's behavior. This class engaged my brain like no other. Asking questions and wanting to gain more knowledge, unlike my second-period English class. After this class ended I wanted more. College was coming up in around a year I knew that this had to be a part of my college experience. I planned to double major in communication arts and psychology and a minor in criminal justice at Virginia Commonwealth University. I got in December of last year to my major and knew that I had completed part one of my dream, but there was much more to go. I want to be a criminologist. For those who don't know what that is, it's a person who studies crime, the criminals themselves, and why they commit the crimes they do. I won't understand and predict the trends of upcoming crimes, Be able to follow leads to solve the next case, and talk with the actual criminals themselves to get a real perspective on the crimes they commit. This will help out community fight off robberies, mass shootings, or even serial killers. With my degree, I will be able to work and fight against the high crime right in America and try to help criminals with rehabilitation and understanding so things like this won't happen again. With the help of this scholarship, I will be able to gain my degree and also gain the knowledge to save the world from crime and give citizens an understanding of why things like this happen.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    GRAFFITI ARTS SCHOLARSHIP
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. This scholarship will help me achieve my dreams. Let me share my message with the world and gain more knowledge on things I am already passionate about. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    Jaqaun Webb Scholarship
    Going to college is something that I have been looking forward to for a long time. Every since 9th grade I have had to know where I wanted to go and how to get there. I was pushed forward by my parents, art teacher, band director, other educators, and of course myself. With this push, I have been able to finally meet this goal and get into the college of my dreams. Now comes all the real work. Once I put in my deposit for VCUarts I understood the real gravity of my situation. I now have what I have been working towards for years now I have to keep moving and make more and more goals. One of them is to keep my mental health above water so I don't burn out in the first week. Another one is to make friends and build a community around me while I'm there. Doing so will help me mentally and physically and I will be less likely to get too overwhelmed. While I'm in college I want to double major and minor. My two majors will be psychology and Communication arts and my minor will be music performance. I know this comes with a lot of work but this is something I am greatly passionate about. The benefits are way better than the cons for me. It allows me to gain more knowledge on topics I already love. Getting a college degree sets you up for professional and high-paying jobs in the future right out of school. Lastly, a college degree will show you what to do after school and how to use the degree to its full potential. With all the information you get in college getting out and finding a job should be something that comes easy with hard work on my part. I am so ready to be in a new environment and experiment with everything I love in education. With this scholarship and so many others, I would be able to start my college education and continue it without loans. Making it easier for me in the future with no student debt. College will leave me free and also wanting more. Hopefully, the drive continues and lives on.
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. My goals in my creative practice and in life itself is to create things that are meaningful and that I care about. I want to go to college and double major in communication arts and music performance. In my college life I want to thrive and learn about things I havent even though of. Think outside the box, make new friends, and be a part of the art community in the city. In Richmond, Virginia, where I plan on going to college has a art mixing bowl. With these opportunities and access to professional artist and musicians I can understand what I can do for the community and be the best version of myself before I even graduate. When I step into my career field I want the world to know my name. Ashley Davis the activist, artist, and musician. These things can change the world in a positive way and show how the arts arent something to lay on the back burner. Its something that can create your lifestyle and mold the world around you. I want to make a difference with poetry, stroies, musical forms, and artistic movements. Going into the orchestra in Richmond is going to be one of my main goals. After that trying to fit my art style into a career field or making a totally new one is my next objective. Showing the world in a way that can be considered funny and serious at the same time is what i’m going for. Letting people know they injustice so they can decide for themselves what they want to do and think. In want to create change with my voice, my instrument, and a pencil. If I am able to do this, it will leave me with nothing else to desire.
    Deborah Thomas Scholarship Award
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    Future Is Female Inc. Scholarship
    Feminism to me is the introduction to the notion that women and young girls are able to be viewed and considered equal by society and the government. The elevation of standards and understanding of the opposite sex to consider them as such but also not needed an opposing opinion. Knowing that men or young boys will think what they will but women and young girls can do that and more. An inspirational figure in my life is my own mother. She grew up in a very bad neighborhood and wasn't able to fully express all her ideas and passions. She had her first child during her senior year of high school and still graduated with pride. After getting married she picked up and moved her children and husband to a safer environment out of state. She now owns 5 homes, has her own successful business, and works in healthcare management. She lets me know I can overcome adversity and meet my goals even more. Being a woman in this society is hard enough but adding on being black is a whole other ball game. Feminism is something that was first started by white women which included casting out black women because of racism. Seeing that black women around the world are becoming engineers, doctors, and lawyers makes me smile. Now my outlet is art and music to show injustice. Activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way inspires change in the world around us. I have shown my art on large scales in museum exhibits or smaller scales like my school art shows. I have also started protests at my school for abortion rights against the governor of my state. All of this shows my dedication to the cause and telling people my positions on different topics. Even though this might not be directly contributing to a specific thing it is all about the bigger picture. The more people know, the more people can understand and learn from past mistakes or actions and learn the right way. With all of this said, I want to tell you that a feminist is something I call myself and am dedicated to. This is something that will never end and will push my career to great heights. Please follow me there!
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Mind, Body, & Soul Scholarship
    The college experience is something that is a talked about topic among the media world. Seeing people on tv getting drunk, join faternites, and all the parties make you a little nervous. When thinking about college hollywood hasn’t helped me in my jounrey of discovery and enjoyment. My college experience is probably gonna be a whole lot different. Going to college for art and music is probably gonna lead to burnout, all nighters, and being broke. I know all that sounds like a bad thing but the idea of having a career in something I love the most, greatly overpowers it. I have been waiting for the moment I get to creative, thrive, and completely immerse my self in the arts. My experience with highschool has been work work work on things I will never do outside of school or “In the real world”. College is the idea that what you do here, you take with you to the next level and job you intend to pursue but one thing I have to learn is interaction with other people. I have to get out of my comfort zone, make new friends, and completely push myself into something new. This is gonna be a tough thing to get over. I have had the same friends for 5 years of my life. Nothing changing, the same schedule, and the same routine for 4 years of highschool. Getting out of the cycle will take some hard work and dedication. One thing that can help me not burnout in the cycle will be my creativity. I have to let myself rest and relax in my creation. This will help my mind, body, and soul heal from the hardwork I have put it through. Music and art will relax and challenge me to push myself. It will push me down and pick me up. This means a balance is necessary in my life. Turning my hobbies and passions into work and stress is a hard transition. Learning to have time to work and have time to relax with the same thing is necessary. Enough of the bad I want to talk about everything I love. College gives me freedom and space to be myself. I need a way to express myself without the pressure of family breathing down my back. It allows me my own space in a creative and personal space. College will give me an experience I can never forget or ever get back. So in order for me enjoy it I have to keep myself health. Both mentally and physically and continue to elevate my passion to the next level.
    Holt Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    @normandiealise #GenWealth Scholarship
    Generational wealth is such an interesting phrase. Most people see it as acquiring money and passing it down to the next generation. In simple terms becoming rich and giving it to your children. I see money as a gate way to freedom and a comfortable life but with freedom come responsibility. Seeing that generational weath is mostly in the hands of the white people in our population because of 400 years of slavery and segragation. Its hard for BIPOC individuals to pass on weatlh to our children and this is what I want to speak on. Personally, I am predisposed to a lot of disadvantages in this world. Growing up as a Black Queer girl in America was something that came with a lot of hardships. I used my writing, art, and music to carry me through the rough patches of my life. Doing so made me a stronger and more determined person for my values and passions. My version of paying it forward for future generations is through my artwork. Living with so many adversities I learned what I support and what I don't. Doing so made me very outspoken and loud about what needs to change in our nation. One of my outlets is my art. I protest, speak on issues, and understand opposing opinions all with the stroke of a pencil. I speak for the people with no voice all of the minorities who are too afraid to speak up for themselves or others. I carry this mentality with me and show others how they can help this nation and this world with their voice, writing, and artwork. In my everyday life, I make sure I call out any discrimination, wrongdoing, or injustice I witness. This will slowly make people aware of the problems people outside of themselves face. Get people out of their own bubbles and understand the struggles of friends, family, and strangers. This is what I want my carrer to be. I want it to be inderstadning, political, and worthy of justice. With this I plan to also be apart of a orchestra with a music performance degree. This will help me become no just rich in succes and money but also in ecpereince and creative desire. I want that to be my legacy and what my children can have a create from their own lives and experiences. That is my definition of generational weath. Not just the physical but the ability to learn, create, and change the world around you.
    Amelia Michelle Sanford LGBTQIA+ Memorial Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Valiyah Young Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Adam Montes Pride Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This allows me to create change in my community by highlighting injustice in a digestible way for my audience. Showing how and why we are treated this way in inspire change in the world around us. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Terry Masters Memorial Scholarship
    The everyday world is something that inspires me daily. It is the root of all of my work and how I connect with others. Political subjects and social issues it what drive me forward and give me a purpose to create. I look at the news, social media, or actually participate in protests to understand what, why, and how something is happening and how I stand on it. I express myself with full-on colored pencil drawings to even digital cartoons. I have done things like black lives matter, trump rallies, and even abortion. These things let me speak my voice and the voice of the minorities around me and let other people know how we get treated in the everyday world.
    Community Reinvestment Grant: Pride Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school, I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “I’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words, I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is a human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    Wild Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is a human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. Digital art gives me a more illustrative voice and I can express my opinions in a more cartoonish format. It makes hard topics more digestable for the viewer and the audience. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    JADED Recovery Scholarship
    My perception of alcohol is based on one really late night or very early morning. I was at my dad's apartment to stay the weekend when I woke up to a very loud knock on the front door. I got up and went to the door and wondering who could be knocking on the door at this time of the night. I went first sneaking my eye through the peephole of the door to see my dad's girlfriend. Even through a small hole, you can see she was disoriented, leaning over, and very much intoxicated. I called my dad up out of bed while opening the door to let her in. She walked in with two large and uncoordinated steps yelling "I can't see! I can't see!" Mind you she had her eyes closed while doing this. My dad say the same thing I did and told her "well open your eyes then." She informed him that her eyes were in fact opened and they were burning as she tried to pry them open. I sat back on the couch watching them walk to the bathroom and wash their eyes out. Then she became violent in a quick switch of emotion. She started hitting, punching, and kicking my dad wildly. Saying he wasn't helping her and he was making it worse. My dad tried to restrain her but before he was able to she broke his glasses and smashed them on the ground. My dad yelled at me to go in the bedroom while they wrestled for dominance in what was supposed to be the family room. I ran to the room and locked the door behind me. My heart was beating faster than it ever has before and I was scared that my dad was being injured or even worse killed. All the noises weren't helping my thoughts either. The yelling, stomping, banging, and insults I was hearing were the worst part of this whole situation. After most of the noises stopped I heard my dad's voice call to me and tell me to come out of the room. With all of my stuff, I walked out and followed him to the door. While walking down the steps of the apartment complex I saw my dad's stuff laying there. His clothes, DVDs, and other belongings are being stepped on by the people residing there. I was shocked and scared when my dad told me to call my grandma to come to pick me up. As I sat there waiting for her my dad called his brother in Maryland. Telling him he was on the way. Because of this situation, I wasn't able to see my father for 5 months. He was without a place to live and a car to drive and this affected the way I see relationships in the future. I feel like she took some time away from me that I could've spent with my dad and my siblings. Every day I think back on this situation and drinking is not something that appeals to me. Something that will always send me back to this time in my life. Continuing on through my life this will always be something that is very traumatic to think about but I think of it as a learning experience. Drinking is just not for me and hopefully, people will find that out for themselves.
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Tim Watabe Doing Hard Things Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Share Your Poetry Scholarship
    Life is like a lazy river Slowly floating around the curves Water splashing you in the face Kids keep bumping into you But you still push on Even when it pushes you too hard Coming up to the exit You want to get off .. It becomes too much to handle But something pushes you forward If its your family, friends, and even the little kids that splashed you You slowly find the fun of the rough waters The energy of the people around you And the freedom of floating The ride you always wanted to be on Making you smile with each bump of the water The buckets that pour water on your head make you giggle Instead of making you want to rush off The rushing water steaming you ahead to the exit doesn’t make you sad anymore It makes you look back with admiration This time you’re prepared to get off Happy with how the ride ended and Understanding your ride is over for good
    She Rose in STEAM Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words, I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. Leaving space for a more open society with fewer adversities for black and brown people to face in their lives. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Desiree Jeana Wapples Scholarship for Young Women
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed.I've read many books on the introduction of activism. How they have changed the nation they live in and slowly but surely adopt new values and traditions into their countries. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Palette & Purpose Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America it sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed.I've read many books on the introduction of activism. How they have changed the nation they live in and slowly but surely adopt new values and traditions into their countries. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art my identity would not be the same.
    Sharen and Mila Kohute Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, walkouts, demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, and musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. I helped myself realize that my identity isn't something I should be afraid of or look down upon its something I should embrace. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    John Traxler Theatre Scholarship
    My Art journey has always been in the background. Slowly peeking its head when critical times came by. These sparks of color molded who I am today. So let me paint the picture for you. I'll start way back in elementary school. During 2nd grade I received negative comments about my hair. Kids would ask, “Why does your hair feel like a sponge?” When saying this they were touching my hair up and down like a trampoline. While it didn’t bother me as much back then, reflecting on these words makes me feel less than my peers. These moments of my life shaped how I viewed my hair. Now skipping ahead to 8th grade. I moved to a new area around 30 minutes away. While at the new school I realized something. I realized that I am gay. This did not come easy. It was a lot of questioning and figuring out attraction and relationships. Slowing learning what I like and don’t like. My family has always been very supportive of me since I was a little tomboy back in Elementary school. While I knew they were supportive, some part of me didn’t want to take the risk yet. Once I was “ready” I texted my mom that “i’m bisexual.” which was a lie … that I didn’t know was a lie yet. Like an ordinary coming out, she waited for me to say the words she already knew were coming. Later that day I finally said the word lesbian. With these words I shaped how I viewed myself. Now entering High School in a rural area you see the different mindsets and opinions people have. Hearing from peers, parents, and siblings about racism, homophobia, transphobia, misogyny, etc. I stepped out of my box and started to speak out. Started holding protests, and walkouts demonstrating how you should act in the face of diversity. Forcing change when we needed it the most. This shaped how I viewed activism. Now with all this in mind, I wanted to pose a question to you. Can your identity shape your art and creativity? Art itself is human expression in a visual, spiritual, musical form that represents a powerful statement of life, imagination, and fulfillment. Knowing how you fit into society can change how you express yourself. Being a Queer black Afab person in America sets me apart from the rest of the population. Because of this, activism has always been something that is ingrained into my hand. With every stroke of the pencil, it shows the life of a minority on the page and slowly gives a voice to the oppressed. This is a passion I have had ever since I knew I had different hair from the rest of my classmates Or when I knew that I had different crushes than the rest of my friends. Without identity, art would be a shallow remembrance of ideas. And without Art, my identity would not be the same.
    TBC Academic Scholarship
    Pay it forward is such an interesting phrase. Many people see pay it forward as related to charity or rich people giving money to the less fortunate. I see paying it forward as a statement for black families and parents who struggled growing up finally have a life they can be proud of. Handing their opportunities and growth to their children so they can have the life they always wanted. I see paying it forward as our ancestors giving us a platform and changing the country that gave them so much turmoil so we can build and grow our nation for the better. Lastly, I see paying it forward as our young people protesting and trying to change laws and legislation to help form our world, values, and legacies for the newer generations. Personally, I am predisposed to a lot of disadvantages in this world. Growing up as a Black Queer girl in America was something that came with a lot of hardships. I used my writing, art, and music to carry me through the rough patches of my life. Doing so made me a stronger and more determined person for my values and passions. My version of paying it forward for future generations is through my artwork. Living with so many adversities I learned what I support and what I don't. Doing so made me very outspoken and loud about what needs to change in our nation. One of my outlets is my art. I protest, speak on issues, and understand opposing opinions all with the stroke of a pencil. I speak for the people with no voice all of the minorities who are too afraid to speak up for themselves or others. I carry this mentality with me and show others how they can help this nation and this world with their voice, writing, and artwork. In my everyday life, I make sure I call out any discrimination, wrongdoing, or injustice I witness. This will slowly make people aware of the problems people outside of themselves face. Get people out of their own bubbles and understand the struggles of friends, family, and strangers. With the work of everyone reading this, we can pay it forward to make sure people in the newer generations don't have to face the same bigotry that we grew up with and understand the problems with that mindset. In this world paying it forward is necessary and something I work towards every day, maybe you should too.