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Anyia Brooks-Manning

1525

Bold Points

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Finalist

Bio

Hello! I'm Anyia Brooks-Manning. I am Haitian and African-American. My life goals are to be a museum curator and be able to inspire generations by observing the past to help motivate their future. I want people to interact actively with the past through performances and storytelling and to develop an understanding of others outside of their own cultures. I have been published in my high school's literary magazine "the Ink, for three years. I want to travel to other countries and explore cultures and all the fun activities people participate in daily. I am a High Point University Fall 2023 Dean's List Recipient. In high school, I was a member of the Société honoraire de français, The National English Honors Society, and the Quill and Scroll Honor Society for Journalism. I received a certificate of honor for participating in Le Grands Concours, the national French contest The American Association of Teachers in the French national contest. I won my high school's world language department's "Underclass Award for Excellence in French" in my Junior year. I received the "Outstanding Senior in French" award from the American Association of Teachers of French.

Education

High Point University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Anthropology
    • Sociology and Anthropology
  • Minors:
    • Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other
  • GPA:
    3.7

Cannon School

High School
2020 - 2023
  • GPA:
    3.9

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • History
    • Museology/Museum Studies
    • Anthropology
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Museums and Institutions

    • Dream career goals:

      curator

    • Writing Curator

      Cannon School Literary Magazine "The Ink"
      2020 – 20233 years
    • Inventory Quality Specialist

      Novant Health
      2023 – 20241 year
    • Player/Vocal Leader

      Cannon School Womens Basketball
      2019 – 20234 years
    • Southern Belle

      Voices From The Past
      2018 – 20202 years

    Sports

    Basketball

    Varsity
    2021 – 20232 years

    Basketball

    Junior Varsity
    2019 – 20212 years

    Awards

    • defensive player of the year

    Arts

    • Voices From The Past

      Acting
      2018 – 2021

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      High Point University — Seed packet Maker
      2024 – 2024

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    I have advocated for positive social change within the minority communities in my high school by mentoring the middle school affinity group during my first and second years, giving them advice, and sharing my experiences in navigating a predominantly white institution. I have given them the tools necessary to mediate harrowing situations that can be mentally tiring in a day-to-day situation. Also, I have participated in a matter involving the use of the N-word at my PWI, as well as a discussion on the topic of sexual violence. Many students felt as though matters involving the use of the n-word by non-black students were being overlooked by the administration, with the only punishment for the use of the word being to write a letter as an apology to the school. I felt as though it removed accountability for the actions of students as they didn't apologize to the black students that they harmed through the use of the word and advocated for an apology to the black students as a whole in addition to a community restoration. I also found that the topic of sexual violence was viewed as taboo despite many students falling victim to it. I went to trusted adults and informed them of my opinion on the topic. I informed them that we must break the taboo and talk about sexual violence openly so that when it happens, a student isn't shamed into not talking about what happened and hiding the event that has taken place. But, the most significant adversity I faced that has affected me personally was the death of my grandmother. My grandmother was "my person" as she taught me how to read when I was younger, and I always wanted to stay at her home. My grandmother always engaged me in activities, from teaching me how to garden to telling me stories of when she protested during the civil rights movement. I was gardening with my grandmother when I learned I was allergic to tomatoes. She was an energetic woman whose favorite color constantly changed when you asked her (although my family agreed it was yellow), and her favorite flower was the sunflower. My grandmother never allowed my family to grieve her as she wanted her funeral to be like a party. My grieving process consisted of me diving headfirst back into my sport and occupying my time with reading so I wouldn't have to think about it. Through the years, I would find myself trying different methods to occupy my time; writing worked best for me. Through writing, I could express my melancholy emotions and fears by letting her go on paper. I learned to let go through literature about death, especially reading the novel A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness. Knowing there was a character who struggled with grief like me helped me understand that there was a more extensive community struggling with grief and helped me manage my emotions.
    RonranGlee Literary Scholarship
    Now my charms are all o’erthrown, And what strength I have ’s mine own, Which is most faint. Now ’tis true I must be here confined by you, Or sent to Naples. Let me not, Since I have my dukedom got And pardoned the deceiver, dwell In this bare island by your spell, But release me from my bands With the help of your good hands. Gentle breath of yours my sails Must fill, or else my project fails, Which was to please. Now I want Spirits to enforce, art to enchant, And my ending is despair, Unless I be relieved by prayer, Which pierces so that it assaults Mercy itself, and frees all faults. As you from crimes would pardoned be, Let your indulgence set me free. In The Tempest, Scene V Epilogue, Prospero tells the audience that he has gotten rid of his magic, and he needs the audience help and forgiveness, through the audience's cheers and loud applause, to pardon from his actions on the island and free him from the island so that he may attend Miranda and Ferdinand’s wedding and return to Milan to retire. During the Early Modern period, epilogues were used to convey the play's lessons and themes. For Prospero, the lessons he is teaching the audience are freedom and forgiveness. He does so by delivering a Soliloquy that has a balanced rhyme scheme, employing metaphors for his situation, and devices that emphasize his phrases and engage the audience. The ends of all the lines of the epilogue rhyme, which has not occurred so often in the text. The balanced rhyme scheme is proven with all ending word rhyming such as O’erthrown, own; dwell, spell; band, hands. The balanced lines give off the impression that Prospero is still in control. The words are all carefully chosen as though he is still exacting spell, but instead he is giving us his final request before the curtains close. There is a constant rhythm throughout the epilogue. The epilogue is carried out entirely in lambic Tetrameter, and gives a soothing, calming effect on the audience at the end of the play. Each line in the epilogue has a constant number of beats, in this case,7-8 beats in each line. This adds to the impression that Prospero has very thoroughly thought this speech out. In his epilogue, Prospero says, "Release me from my bands" which is a metaphor as he isn't physically bonded in any sense but suggests that he is bonded mentally by his many years on the island. He also says, "Gentle breath of yours my sails must fill". In the sense of being an epilogue he is asking for kind words. However, while in character of Prospero, it suggests that he needs to use others to his benefit, for his project' to succeed like he has used the aid of Ariel and other spirits, while also manipulating the long journey of love for Miranda and Ferdinand to unite Naples and Milan to get his dukedom. Prospero uses sibilance in his epilogue, though only in a few areas. The way and context in which it is used can be said to have been in a more menacing context. An example of this is: "And pierces so that it assaults". The s sound adds a sharp sound that accentuates the word and enforces meaning into the phrase. Despite the loss of his powers, Prospero is still in control of the situation and his plan of escape is well thought out, showing that he has gained more control of his fate. Prospero hands the audience his magic abilities and asks for forgiveness in the form of his freedom.
    Share Your Poetry Scholarship
    Sea You feel like you're drifting on a sea No anchor to hold you down Daddy, it can hold the title. It was never a good example. The visions of his anger locked away. And the signs of his joy have been replaced and stored Behind the unbreakable walls of a vault Which, if opened, will give truth to all of your faults The push and pull, the highs and lows You succumb to the whims with no way to let go You'll drift and drift, or you'll climb the highest mountain. So you'll peer into the tv. And see who you are vs. who you are supposed to be, And it will push you deeper into the sea Surrounded by the fears and nightmares of who you can’t be, Mommy tries to help And so it pushes you into a frenzy A burst of uncontrolled energy The cleaning, the reading, and the random words of the extraordinary But you won't come down, and they won't take you seriously Till you're pushed back into the drifting sea Of anger, lethargy, of anergy With no escape from a drifting sea
    Sunshine Legall Scholarship
    I want to earn a doctorate in Sociology and Anthropology. I want to become a museum curator and better my community through cultural exchange opportunities involving deeper dives into cultures to establish a sense of familiarity with everyone in my community. Only 7.1 percent of Sociology professors are black, and I want to increase the black voices that are heard in the field. Activities include sharing folklore and evaluating linguistic differences and their historical basis in a way that allows for a deeper understanding as a community and creates a space where no one feels as though they are less than others. I want to educate my community and develop a system that generates an immersive and collaborative learning environment. I would also create cultural hotspots to quickly explore cultural foods, dance, music, and art. The specific cultures would rotate per week. One day the exploration may have soul food, and the next, it would have french foods. I want to allow the community to diversify their foods and flavor profiles, enabling my community to learn more about other dietary palates that they may want to integrate into some of their meals. There would be street performances and dance classes to engage the community in new cultures to develop open-mindedness and communication in ways other than speech through food, music, and dance. I want to build a cultural center highlighting specific underlooked ethnic groups within the United States and display their heritage on a grander stage. During my time at Cannon School, I have commited to bringing diverse groups together by mentoring the Middle school affinity group during my freshman and sophomore years, giving them advice, and sharing my experiences navigating a predominantly white institution. I have given them the tools necessary to mediate harrowing situations that can be mentally tiring in a day-to-day situation. Also, I have participated in a matter involving the use of the N-word at my PWI and a discussion on sexual violence. Many students felt as though matters involving the use of the n-word by non-black students were being overlooked by the administration. I advocated for ways to demonstrate apologetic action and learn why using that word harms those around them. I also found that the topic of sexual violence was viewed as taboo despite many students falling victim to it. I went to trusted adults and informed them of my opinion on the topic. I informed them that we must break the taboo and talk about sexual violence openly so that when it happens, a student isn't shamed into not talking about what happened and hiding the event that has taken place. I had talked about bringing the school together to discuss these topics so that if a person experiences these problems, they feel safe enough to go to someone. In addition to social advocacy, I have been a part of The Ink and I have acted as a Southern Belle for Voices From the Past in Charlotte. The Ink is the Cannon upper school literary magazine and combines an accumulation of students' works, ranging from creative writing to artwork and fashion, chosen to reflect the diversity in creativity from Cannon’s upper school. Acting as a Southern Belle for Voices From The Past has allowed to combine my love of history and acting by telling those who want to learn more about the founder cemetery in Charlotte. As a southern belle, my stories connected all other the actors there whom represented those who are buried within the cemetery. I want to continue accumulating the creative works that represent the diversity and history of regions.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    I am achieving. Every day starts at zero. By the end of the day, I must achieve something tangible. And by "every day," I mean workdays, weekends, and vacations. I have advocated for positive social change within the minority communities within my high school by serving as a mentor to the Middle school affinity group and giving them advice while sharing my experiences navigating a predominantly white institution. I gave them the tools necessary to mediate harrowing situations that can be mentally taxing in a day-to-day situation. Also, I have participated in a matter involving using the N-word at my PWI and discussing sexual violence. Many students felt the administration was overlooking matters involving the use of the n-word by non-black students. I felt it removed accountability for students' actions as they didn't apologize to the black students harmed through the use of the word and advocated for an apology to the black students as a whole in addition to a community restoration. I also fought the discussion of sexual violence being a taboo topic within a school environment to make school a safe space for all. I informed trusted adults that we must break the taboo and talk about sexual violence openly so that when it happens, a student isn't shamed into not talking about what happened and hiding the event that has taken place. I have contributed to the Women's basketball community by helping work basketball camps and clinics to help build leaders in the basketball community with younger age groups. I served as a model and helped to inspire them to want to play basketball and get better at the skills required. I am Competitive and intelligent. I like exercising the "muscles" of my brain, trying to solve a problem, develop an idea, or understand another person's feelings. I enjoy my time alone because it is time for musing and reflection. I am introspective. I am commanding. I feel no discomfort with imposing my views on others and sharing them. I am not frightened by confrontation; instead, I know that confrontation is the first step toward resolution. I feel compelled to present the facts or the truth, no matter how unpleasant. I need things to be clear between people and challenge them to be clear-eyed and honest. While I may not talk a lot, I will say something with confidence and power when I have something to say.
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    I want to earn a doctorate in Sociology and Anthropology. I want to become a museum curator and better my community through cultural exchange opportunities involving deeper dives into cultures to establish a sense of familiarity with everyone in my community. Activities include sharing folklore and evaluating linguistic differences and their historical basis in a way that allows for a deeper understanding as a community and creates a space where no one feels as though they are less than others. I want to educate my community and develop a system that generates an immersive and collaborative learning environment. I would also create cultural hotspots to quickly explore cultural foods, dance, music, and art. The specific cultures would rotate per week. One day the exploration may have soul food, and the next, it would have french foods. I want to allow the community to diversify their foods and flavor profiles, enabling my community to learn more about other dietary palates that they may want to integrate into some of their meals. There would be street performances and dance classes to engage the community in new cultures to develop open-mindedness and communication in ways other than speech through food, music, and dance. I want to build a cultural center highlighting specific underlooked ethnic groups within the United States and display their heritage on a grander stage. An obstacle that I have faced that has affected me personally was my grandmother's death. My grandmother was "my person" as she taught me how to read when I was younger, and I always wanted to stay at her home. My grandmother always engaged me in activities, from teaching me how to garden to stories of when she protested during the civil rights movement. I was gardening with my grandmother when I discovered I was allergic to tomatoes. She was an energetic woman whose favorite color was constantly changed when you asked her (although my family agreed it was yellow), and her favorite flower was the sunflower. My grandmother never allowed my family to grieve her; she wanted her funeral to be like a party. My grieving process consisted of me diving headfirst back into my sport and occupying my time with reading so I wouldn't have to think about it. Through the years, I would find myself trying different methods to occupy my time; writing worked best for me. Through writing, I could express my melancholy emotions and fears about letting her go on paper. I learned to let go of literature about death, especially reading the novel A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.
    Herb Collins Scholarship
    I always want to create inclusive and just school environments. Inclusivity is providing equal access and including everyone within a community. Inclusive environments ensure that everyone feels safe, supported, and encouraged to express their views or concerns within the community. The Fellowship guarantees that the women around me feel safe and able to have their voices heard. I enjoy exchanging ideas and learning from others while demonstrating that I value everyone by remaining open and engaging in all conversations. The inclusion and Diversity of all women create a better future for those who will follow us within our fields. A just environment includes a system of shared accountability in which everyone is accountable for the rules in place and for responding to the behaviors of their peers in a fair and just manner. I want to contribute to a just environment by bringing awareness to campus problems and engaging in conversation on policy changes that can better a situation. I want to be a trusted member of my community and assist others with the problems they face on campus that they feel are unjust. Human error is acceptable, but the tangible symbol of a just culture is how we as a community can move forward from a conflict with a relationship of trust and accountability. I want to earn a doctorate in Sociology and Anthropology. I want to become a museum curator and better my community through cultural exchange opportunities involving deeper dives into cultures to establish a sense of familiarity with everyone in my community. Activities include sharing folklore and evaluating linguistic differences and their historical basis in a way that allows for a deeper understanding as a community and creates a space where no one feels as though they are less than others. I want to educate my community and develop a system that generates an immersive and collaborative learning environment. I would also create cultural hotspots to quickly explore cultural foods, dance, music, and art. The specific cultures would rotate per week. One day the exploration may have soul food, and the next, it would have french foods. Allowing the community to diversify their foods and flavor profiles, enabling my community to learn more about other dietary palates that they may want to integrate into some of their meals. There would be street performances and dance classes to engage the community in new cultures to develop open-mindedness and communication in ways other than speech through food, music, and dance. I want to build a cultural center highlighting specific underlooked ethnic groups within the United States and display their heritage on a grander stage.
    Ryan T. Herich Memorial Scholarship
    I chose Anthropology because anthropology is a combination of fields that I admired growing up and answers one of my biggest questions “What makes us human.” My initial interest in anthropology formed when I watched the tv series Bones, whose main character is a forensic anthropologist with the FBI. My interest in anthropology developed when I wanted to study linguistics and cultures worldwide and their histories. I was interested in studying issues such as student diversity but also on a global scale through food environments, criminal justice, gender-related issues, poverty and inequality, and archeological science. Anthropology helps for a deeper understanding and connection with the regions taught, enabling me to work and communicate within these regions with a deeper understanding of history. Through Engaging with Literature, I observe other writers study human behavior, creating microcosms of their community through literature and answering questions on human behavior and the society in which they live. Those writers include William Faulkner, Sherman Alexie, and James Baldwin, whose microcosms reflect the actions of social anthropologists in asking the question, “Why do people do what they do?” And “How is society organized?” My interest is in popular music's ability to shape how we communicate and adapt style, a person’s vocabulary, politics, and identity. The music we allow and celebrate in society exposes the needs, values, and desires we chase. It would benefit me to use popular music to study what makes us human and how we define and display our self-identity through music and communication. I can use music to learn about traditions and rhythms that define different cultures and be able to find the roots and influences in reference to the history of the community and the history of the songs. Popular songs and Communications benefit others because it allows a unique interpretation and layer of a culture or a person's identity to be interwoven with the visual markers seen in the displays within the halls of museums. Popular music highlights the ambiance of who can be represented and aids in communicating to others the necessary emotions of a group represented by an exhibit. It explains how the imagery is seen in the reflection of popular Malcolm X seen on the cover art of Boogie Down Productions' “ By All Means Necessary” and how the cross-section between the Black Panther Party and Hip Hop music supports the intercourse of ideals to a newer generation that is adapted and carried on into the future.