For DonorsFor Applicants
user profile avatar

Amina Aliou Dewa

8025

Bold Points

26x

Nominee

3x

Finalist

1x

Winner

Bio

Hello, my name is Amina. I come from a small town called Yaounde and my dream is to become a pediatrician. My dad always advised me to remember where I came from and to aim for my goals. It has been my guiding light as I journey from my hometown in Cameroon to the United States. Even though becoming a doctor is not the norm in my family, especially for a girl, the desire to help others heal took root in me after losing a cousin to Cameroon's healthcare struggles. As a proud Fulani, I'm currently studying Biology at GSU, and I'm also working as a research assistant in a nutrition lab. My focus is on prediabetes in new immigrants. I believe in the power of laughter, even in serious situations. I'm breaking norms and chasing my dreams with a touch of humor in the serious business of making a difference. Thank you for being a part of my journey as I navigate through the twists and turns toward becoming a Pediatrician.

Education

Georgia State University

Bachelor's degree program
2022 - 2026
  • Majors:
    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
  • GPA:
    4

International Baccalaureate Program

High School
2020 - 2022
  • GPA:
    3.8

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      MD

    • Living Learning Community Assistant

      Georgia State University Housing
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Tutor

      Student Support Services GSU
      2023 – 2023
    • Student Assistant

      Georgia State University Housing
      2022 – 2022
    • Event Lead

      Seedlings
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Medical Translator

      Mayo Darle Hospital
      2021 – 2021

    Sports

    Running Club at GSU

    Club
    2023 – Present1 year

    Soccer

    Junior Varsity
    2021 – 20221 year

    Awards

    • No but I had much fun

    Research

    • Nutrition Sciences

      Georgia State University — Research Assistant
      2023 – Present

    Arts

    • Enko La Gaiete International School

      Dance Criticism
      No
      2021 – 2022

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Highschool Tutor — Science Tutor Volunteer
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      American Heart Association — Student Volunteer
      2023 – Present
    • Volunteering

      GSU — Student Volunteer
      2023 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Muslim Student Association GSU — Sale Representative
      2023 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Womens Health First — Desk Information
      2023 – 2023
    • Volunteering

      Trees Atlanta — Student Volunteer
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Mayo Darle CMA — Administered blood test to patients to check for HIV. Also, I translated from French to FuLfulde to ensure efficient communication between health providers and patients
      2021 – 2021

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Harriett Russell Carr Memorial Scholarship
    Hello, my name is Amina and every morning, I start my day with a routine that is not just a set of tasks, but a deliberate effort to embody excellence and give back to my community. My day begins with a quiet conversation, not with the universe, but with the Creator. These moments of prayer help to ground me and give me a sense of purpose that carries me through the day. After prayer, breakfast becomes more than just a meal. It's a ritual that nourishes both my body and spirit, fortifying me for the day ahead. As I tackle the items on my to-do list, I make sure that each task is not just about achieving personal goals, but also about making a positive impact on others. The "Others" section of my to-do list is where I focus on giving back. Volunteering at the local clinic is a cornerstone of my community service. Every hour spent volunteering is filled with compassion and helps to bring healing to those in need. Tutoring high school students allows me to guide young minds and babysitting is a cherished responsibility, providing a safe haven for children. Participating in school events allows me to contribute to a vibrant community, and offering help to friends is a pledge to stand by each other, transforming challenges into triumphs. Environmental sustainability is also an important part of my routine. I contribute to planting trees with Trees Atlanta, recognizing that our actions today shape the world of tomorrow. For me, success is not just about completing tasks, but rather about making a positive impact on others. By volunteering at the clinic, tutoring students, and contributing to environmental sustainability, I am weaving a narrative of service and impact. This scholarship is deeply important to me as it brings me one step closer to my dream of becoming a doctor. I aspire to become a doctor because my country, Cameroon, needs better healthcare. This scholarship is a crucial stepping stone toward a future where I can make a significant impact on the healthcare landscape in my community and beyond. As the day unfolds, I find fulfillment in both personal accomplishments and the collective triumphs of those touched by my acts of service. In these moments, success becomes a shared journey, a testament to the belief that our actions, no matter how small, can create waves of positive change within our community.
    RonranGlee Literary Scholarship
    Paragraph: Epictetus' "Enchiridion": Chapter 1, Paragraph 2 Now the things within our power are by nature free, unrestricted, unhindered; but those beyond our power are weak, dependent, restricted, alien. Remember, then, that if you attribute freedom to things by nature dependent and take what belongs to others for your own, you will be hindered, you will lament, you will be disturbed, you will find fault both with gods and men. But if you take for your own only that which is your own and view what belongs to others just as it really is, then no one will ever compel you, no one will restrict you; you will find fault with no one, you will accuse no one, you will do nothing against your will; no one will hurt you, you will not have an enemy, nor will you suffer any harm. Hi, my name is Amina, and I am a biology student at Georgia State University. I find joy in reading because it allows me to explore various interpretations from a single sentence, navigating my creativity, and challenging my brain to consider different perspectives. In the lines that follow, I will analyze a profound philosophical work, "Enchiridion" by Epictetus, specifically focusing on Chapter 1, Paragraph 2. Whenever I read "Enchiridion," I am reminded of the power of discipline and self-control. In this selected paragraph, Epictetus realistically explains the dichotomy of control, emphasizing the nature of control and its crucial role in leading a Stoic life. According to him, humans are either in control or out of control, and recognizing when to identify and act upon these levels of control is essential in various aspects of our lives. This exploration of Stoic philosophy has broadened my understanding of its traditions. Stoicism, far beyond a mere political concept, is a state of mind that everyone can cultivate within oneself. As Epictetus asserts, attributing freedom to inherently dependent things can lead to hindrance, lamentation, disturbance, and finding fault with both gods and men. To me, he equates freedom to equality, a concept that ultimately contributes to happiness. How can individuals be truly free if their actions involve taking from others, causing harm, and acting egocentrically to gain power over others? Such behaviors not only prevent us from finding peace and happiness but also lead to despair as our actions conflict with God's rules and the treatment we receive in society. Considering the slave background of Epictetus helps me further understand the solution he provided with the dichotomy of control we humans face. As Epictetus emphasizes, focusing on what is under your control, and acting upon that while accepting that others have control over certain aspects beyond your influence, leads to true human freedom. This philosophy seamlessly aligns with my experiences as a Biology student, providing a practical application of Stoic principles. For instance, deciding to invest four hours each day in studying and working on my coursework is something within my control. Now, the outcome of my efforts, such as getting into medical school, is not entirely under my control. Accepting this truth liberates me from anxiety, stress, and worrying, allowing me to enjoy every step toward becoming a medical doctor. Embracing the Stoic perspective, I recognize that I have done my best, and whatever happens, I am content with the knowledge that I took charge of what was within my control, hence I’m free. In another perspective, what Epictetus truly is trying to convey in his entire book and particularly within this paragraph is to encourage everyone to be themselves, but not just themselves—the best version of themselves. This principle becomes evident when he states, "you will find fault with no one, you will accuse no one, you will do nothing against your will; no one will hurt you, you will not have an enemy, nor will you suffer any harm." In today's society, especially in the Western world, the pressure to conform often leads people to portray an idealized version of themselves, as exemplified by social media. Many individuals strive to present a perfect life—showcasing their meals, relationships, and achievements. However, true authenticity requires neither external validation nor the need to share every aspect of one's life for affirmation. Believing in oneself and acting in a way that every daily is a new day to become a better is the key to being genuine. Only then can one be free from the dichotomy of control, finding peace and contentment within, rather than seeking it from external sources. In conclusion, this particular paragraph by Epictetus successfully unveils the essence of human nature in relation to control. The simplicity of the concept—either we have or don't have control—carries profound implications for our freedom and authenticity. It is when we acknowledge and act upon this fundamental truth in our daily lives that we can truly be free and manifest the best version of ourselves. The Stoic virtue encapsulated in this paragraph should ideally be akin to common sense, yet the imperfect nature of the world often leads people to forget or deliberately ignore this reality. I strongly recommend this book to all philosophy enthusiasts and those who love contemplating different perspectives just like myself. By nurturing a mindset that embraces the dichotomy of control, this paragraph serves as an invitation to live a life marked by freedom, tranquility, and success—defined personally.
    International Student Scholarship
    My name is Amina and I am an international Biology student at Georgia State University. I am originally from Cameroon and my journey to the United States has been full of both ups and downs. I arrived in the US at the age of 17 and my half-brother Ahmed helped make the transition smoother for me. While studying in the US has been exciting, it has also come with the weight of cultural expectations. As a Fulani girl, I faced societal pressure to follow a different path in life, one that did not involve pursuing higher education or becoming a doctor. Cameroon is a country with a diverse population of 150 tribes and over 200 languages, which has led to complex stereotypes. As a Fulani, I faced the stereotype of being a "traditional woman". Choosing a different path for myself, I came to the US to follow my dream of becoming a doctor. However, my journey towards education and my passion for medicine have been challenging. In my community, it is normal for young females to have early marriages, and my decision to pursue higher education and break from this norm has led to marginalization and discrimination. Despite the negative opinions of others, I remain steadfast in my determination to contribute to improving healthcare in Cameroon. The inadequacies of Cameroon's healthcare system hit differently when I lost my cousin to malaria. The experience fueled my determination to become a pediatrician and make a positive impact on healthcare accessibility. My move to the US is not just about personal aspirations; it's about shaping a future where quality healthcare is a right, not a privilege. During my first year in the US, I faced a significant challenge in adapting to a new culture, dealing with isolation, and managing financial stress. Though a part-time job helped, receiving scholarships like the one I was awarded on bold.org provided me with much-needed relief. It allowed me to focus on adapting to the new environment and excel in my coursework. Winning this scholarship would be a game-changer for me. It would not only provide financial support but also give me the opportunity to participate in a pre-medical internship in Peru. I would use all the money I saved for my spring semester to attend this internship instead. This internship would be my first official clinical experience and a chance for me to learn in a global context. With reduced financial stress, I would be able to dedicate more time to my upcoming studies, especially as I tackle Organic Chemistry II and its lab in the upcoming semester. Your support would not only alleviate my financial worries and allow me to excel in my academic journey, but it would mean the world to me. I am committed to making the most of this opportunity and, with your support, achieving my dream of becoming a pediatrician. Thank you for considering my application.
    Bold.org x Forever 21 Scholarship + Giveaway
    @amina.lvss
    Barbara Cain Literary Scholarship
    After a long day of conducting research in the lab, attending organic chemistry lectures, and volunteering in various capacities, I gift myself an additional 30 minutes before bed. I savor this time, feeling refreshed after a hot shower, and enjoy diving into a different country, body, and life while reading a book. Reading has become my favorite self-care activity, having graduated from being a leisurely pursuit to a daily necessity. As a teenager, I preferred reading an interesting mystery book during my free time over attending parties with friends or family. Through books, I have learned how to empathize with others. This empathy has become one of my biggest strengths as a pre-med student. My professors, supervisors, and friends have all pointed out this aspect of my personality, which I believe I have developed through the magic of books. When I read a book, I immerse myself in the thoughts of the protagonist, feeling what they feel, seeing what they see, and hearing what they hear. I become that person for a brief moment. I am confident that the empathy I have developed through reading books will make me a remarkable physician in the future, the best medical doctor I can become. Furthermore, there is a particular book that has had a significant impact on my life. "So Long a Letter" by Mariama Ba tackled major themes that I was destined to face as a young Fulani girl. The theme of "Early Marriage" was a prevalent pressure in my life, but my dad refused to abide by the traditional customs. Reading "So Long a Letter" inspired me and gave me the motivation I needed to work hard during my last two years of high school. I worked hard enough to earn a scholarship to GSU, far away from my "destiny." I struggled a lot and experienced constant anxiety and fear of giving up my goals and aspirations to become someone's wife, a person I probably didn't even know. I was just 17 when I started to stand up for myself, just like Ramatoulaye, the main character in the book. I decided to pursue pediatric medicine because of my personal ties to children's healthcare. My cousin, whom I viewed as a sister, passed away during those difficult times, inspiring me to make a difference in the world. Now, I hope to become an inspiration to other Fulani girls in the future. Many of my pre-med friends find it strange that I am an active member of the book club at GSU. But what they fail to understand is that in books you have more to gain than just improving your vocabulary and English. Books taught me not to give up on my dreams and to stay true to my values even when my entire world is against me. I love books. This scholarship will be extremely helpful for me to pay my part of the tuition. The Scholarship I received from GSU, allows me to pay tuition as an instate student instead of the international tuition. My dad pays half, and I pay the other half. Being an international student, there are a lot of regulations preventing me from getting a high-paying job. Therefore, I juggle between two part-time jobs and fully commit to my education as a full-time student. I am very ambitious and know that I will definitely reach my dreams and positively affect the world, even if it's just in a small way, one day.
    Barbara J. DeVaney Memorial Scholarship Fund
    Hi, my name is Amina, and I am currently studying Biology at GSU with a concentration in pre-medicine. I also work as a Research Assistant in Dr. Shaikh's Nutrition Lab, where we research pre-diabetes in newly arrived US immigrants. As an international student from Cameroon and a member of the Fulani tribe, my identity is incredibly important to me. Being a Fulani woman is directly linked to my aspirations of becoming a physician. The Fulani tribe is scattered throughout Africa, and women are often assigned specific roles and functions that measure their value and beauty, and even intellectual capacities. Growing up, I was raised in a very cultural and traditional environment, which ingrained some negative thoughts and stereotypes. Unfortunately, one of the traditions of the Fulani tribe is to marry girls at a young age, usually between 15-18. This practice is used to raise the status of the family among the extended family in general. When I was a junior in high school, my parents were pressured by extended family members to find me a husband. However, my father, who has never been a fan of this tradition, decided to ignore the pressure and insults from his siblings. He gave me the right to choose my own path, which is unfortunately not the case for many Fulani girls, including some of my cousins. It's really tough to be confronted with such a destiny at such a young age. The feeling of defeat and constant anxiety does not let you sleep in peace anymore. The only way for me to continue my studies without any repercussions was to go far away, to the US. I worked extremely hard to come to the US. I studied hard and applied to the college that cost the least and gave me the best scholarship, which happened to be GSU. Luckily, GSU awarded me a scholarship that my dad agreed to pay half of, and I will have to figure out how to pay the other half, which is around $6,000 per semester. I want to become a physician not because I'm trying to prove my worth to anyone, but because I hope to become an inspiration to other girls from my tribe, to stand up and better our community together. If I'm granted this scholarship, I plan to use the money to continue my studies and become the Fulani woman who studied medicine and helps other Fulani girls and girls all over the world to stand up for their dreams. I believe that nothing should stop anyone from lending their own hand to humanity, be it cultural, financial, social, or physical.
    Brandon Tyler Castinado Memorial Scholarship
    I can remember the summer when I was 9 years old, and my cousin from another city came to stay with us. She and I bonded more than ever during that summer. We became besties and promised each other to always meet during the summer and share our adventures. The next summer she didn’t come, she passed away by the end of the year because of severe malaria she had, and I wasn’t there for her, I could not help her… I was traumatized and honestly, I never healed from that wound. I felt like it was my fault and I had to do something for her. About 3 years later, when I was 12 years old, my dad got diagnosed with hypertension. An estimate of about 2000 people died a year in Cameroon from hypertension. That same feeling came back, the feeling I felt when my cousin passed away, the feeling of guilt and uselessness. Fortunately for us, my parents had been saving for our college education and therefore used that money to afford treatment abroad in France. The health condition of my dad was never the same after that, but I was extremely grateful he was safe and back with us. It was a dark face for my family, but we made it, and that was all that mattered to me. What about the other millions of Cameroonians who cannot afford to send their loved ones abroad to get the healthcare they need? Will they just let them die and the number of recorded deaths will keep rising? Cameroon is a developing country, a country in which most people struggled to afford their basic needs, get an education, and survive. I was born there, so I’ve had countless opportunities to meet with people of my age who lost their family members because of poor healthcare services. There are no good hospitals, and few good nurses and doctors, and people keep dying unnecessarily. What I am looking forward to, in joining the healthcare industry, is changing the situation in my country. I’m not saying I plan on changing the entire system on my own. As long as I impact the lives of a single family, that would mean everything to me. After many cultural obstacles I faced, last year, I flew from Cameroon to the US and majored in biology to follow the typical pre-med track at GSU. I recently changed my major to nursing for several reasons. One of them is, as a nurse, I can get the education and experience I need to go back to my country and start achieving my lifelong goal, which is to open a clinic, accessible to everyone. Also, my goal is to become a medical doctor, perhaps 7 years after being a nurse, I can save some money for medical school and also support my parents in my sisters’ education. I know my plans may not be the best plan to change the healthcare situation of my country, but should I just let my dreams go away without even trying? Should I just act like everyone and wait for a change? My clinic may not bring about the change I really want for my country, but I deeply believe that it may start the change I am looking for. Even though I am not the type to give up easily, this scholarship will give me the force to continue, as I am struggling financially to cover my tuition each semester as an international student. Thank you for believing in me and giving me the opportunity to ease my journey.
    Al-Haj Abdallah R Abdallah Muslim Scholarship
    I am a Biological Science at Georgia State University with a premedical concentration. I moved from Cameroon to the US about 6 months ago to pursue my passion for medicine. I belong to the Fulani tribe in Cameroon, well known for being one of the few tribes dominated by the Islamic Religion. I was born and raised in a Muslim African household surrounded by non-Muslim Neighbours. My passion for medicine has been driven for years by the healthcare situation in my country. Medical facilities in Cameroon are extremely limited. Even in large cities, like Yaoundé where I lived, emergency care and hospitalization for major illnesses and surgery are impeded by the lack of trained specialists, outdated diagnostic equipment, and inadequate sanitation. As for many rural areas, medical facilities may not even exist. I can still remember seven years ago when my dad was diagnosed with hypertension and could not get the appropriate health services in my country and so he had to travel to France and stay there for about three months. This unfortunate situation affected not just my dad but every member of my family including myself. Due to how expensive all of this was, my mum took a second job and we all stood emotionally and financially unstable. I remember how I ate only one meal per day, considering that we lived together with our extended family and other relatives. It was a hard period in my life, and I believe it was the period that made me establish my mind on medicine as a potential career. There are a lot of things that I had to give up when moving to the US. My family, my Qur’anic school, my friends, and my peaceful life. Life has become much harder as I worry about money, tuition, and working extra hours. Apart from my passion for medicine, my identity as a Muslim and the trust that I put in Allah has been the driving force that keeps me going. The only refuge space that I have on campus is the Muslim Student Association (MSA) prayer room, which I visit quite frequently. There, I made close friends, volunteered as much as I could and assisted other Muslims like me who may be facing any hardship emotionally and sometimes financially. I am looking forward to becoming part of the club board member next semester because of how comfortable I feel when I go there. Furthermore, I recently volunteered at a local masjid (Masjid Al-Momineen) where I helped Women Health First Organization to spread their message and services to Muslim women in the community. It was a wonderful experience because it reminded me once more why I chose healthcare as a potential career. I pray to Allah that my knowledge and education be of use to my family, my county, the ummah of the Prophete Mouhamad (SAW) and the entire world if possible. If my application is granted, I would be forever grateful to you for the support you have provided as this scholarship will help remove a heavy load from my back.
    Lauren Czebatul Scholarship
    “No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another,” said Charles Dickens. My first encounter with volunteering, was as a requirement, one thing on my list to do for me to graduate from high school. As someone who did not know how to balance academics and socializing, I hated the fact that I needed to go out of my comfort zone to be able to graduate. Then, during the summer of 2021, I was accepted as an intern at a hospital in a rural area of my country. Since this internship was not a paid internship, it was therefore considered a volunteering activity. During this internship, I discovered a new passion of mine, the passion for making people happy. The passion for making others smile and contributing to their well-being. During this internship, there was a vaccination campaign that required a certain number of hospital personnel to travel to surrounding secluded communities where the inhabitants were being affected by typhoid and waterborne diseases. I decided to take part in the vaccination campaign with the hope of being as useful as possible to anyone. I can remember running after young boys who were scared of getting vaccinated, recomforting them and being there for them when they were getting the vaccine shots. It was an awesome experience that made volunteering move from being a requirement to a hobby. I moved from Cameroon to the USA to further my education in medicine. To be honest, I was running away from what my culture wanted me to become. This transition in my life was not easy at all, perhaps it was the most courageous thing I’ve ever done so far. I am a biology major right now with a concentration in premed. In my first semester, I hard to learn how to balance having a job and going to school at the same time. My job was my only source of income, saving to pay for my tuition for Spring 2023. Even with all the academic, cultural and financial pressure I was facing, I did not give up my hobby, volunteering. On my weekends I used volunteering as my safe zone. I volunteered whenever I could be it in a religious setting or for the environment. I kept volunteering because I found happiness in doing that. Whenever it was the weekend, after a long tiring week, thinking about the fact that I will be out there helping someone somehow motivated me to keep up with my work. My logic is; Going to college may not be free but going out and planting a tree is free and makes me happy. I am still struggling financially, and I am not ready to give up on my dreams of becoming a doctor. If my application was granted, I will certainly be forever grateful. Getting financial support to pay for my tuition will be very helpful in reducing my burden and letting me focus on what is important to me and to my community.
    Dr. Meme Heineman Scholarship
    I am a first-year International Student at Georgia State University majoring in Biological Science with a concentration in pre-medicine. My motivation to pursue medicine as a potential future career is directly drawn from the poor quality of healthcare provision in my country of birth, Cameroon. My short-term professional goal is to get into Emory School of medicine, while my long-term professional goal is to improve the quality of health care in my country and other Central African Countries. In my junior year of high school, I was able to secure a highly competitive internship at Mayo Darle Hospital in the rural area of the Adamawa region of Cameroon. During this internship, I realized how horrible healthcare conditions were in my country. My passion for medicine completely switches to a lifelong dedication. A dedication that wakes me up every single morning at 6:00 am to prepare for my classes and lectures, a commitment that elevated me as the Event Leader of Seedlings Club at GSU. Seedling is a club that aligns completely with my life principles, as environmental protection and prevention are our primary goals. Aiming to ensure sustainable development, as an Event Leader, I assist in planting trees that will be shared among the club members and any student interested in joining our club. The message behind sharing trees is to inform students about the straight our planet is going through during this 21st century. During my first semester in college, I came to the realization that science and healthcare do not just require me to be good academically. Still, it also entails caring for nature, making valuable connections with people, and caring for my happiness. I got engaged in numerous volunteering activities that constantly reminded me why I am pursuing healthcare as a potential career. During one of my volunteer experiences with Trees Atlanta, I learned how to plant trees so that I would be able to give out the best possible trees to a student on campus. Furthermore, although I have never participated in formal research, my microbiology lab experience was highly research-oriented. I’ve had the opportunity to work with different bacteria cultures and determine the effectiveness of hand washing and the effectiveness of antibiotics in killing those bacteria. From classifying bacteria into gram-negative and gram-positive to finding why my hypothesis was wrong, I’ve valued every moment in the laboratory with my friends and instructor. The research was one of the reasons that influenced my decision to pursue my studies in the US. I am actively applying to incredible research internships where I can get my first official research experience. In conclusion, improving the quality of healthcare in my country is my lifelong dedication, and I am very much enjoying the process I am going through because I love what I am doing, I love caring for the environment, I love sharing love with people, I love being helpful in my community. This scholarship will help me tackle the financial crises I face as an international student.
    Cliff T. Wofford STEM Scholarship
    I am a first-year International Student at Georgia State University majoring in Biological Science with a concentration in pre-medicine. My motivation to pursue medicine as a potential future career is directly drawn from the poor quality of healthcare provision in my country of birth, Cameroon. My short-term professional goal is to get into Emory School of medicine, while my long-term professional goal is to improve the quality of health care in my country and other Central African Countries. In my junior year of high school, I was able to secure a highly competitive internship at Mayo Darle Hospital in the rural area of the Adamawa region of Cameroon. During this internship, I realized how horrible healthcare conditions were in my country. My passion for medicine completely switches to a lifelong dedication. A dedication that wakes me up every single morning at 6:00 am to prepare for my classes and lectures, a commitment that elevated me as the Event Leader of Seedlings Club at GSU. Seedling is a club that aligns completely with my life principles, as environmental protection and prevention are our primary goals. Aiming to ensure sustainable development, as an Event Leader, I assist in planting trees that will be shared among the club members and any student interested in joining our club. The message behind sharing trees is to inform students about the straight our planet is going through during this 21st century. During my first semester in college, I came to the realization that science and healthcare do not just require me to be good academically. Still, it also entails caring for nature, making valuable connections with people, and caring for my happiness. I got engaged in numerous volunteering activities that constantly reminded me why I am pursuing healthcare as a potential career. During one of my volunteer experiences with Trees Atlanta, I learned how to plant trees so that I would be able to give out the best possible trees to a student on campus. Furthermore, although I have never participated in formal research, my microbiology lab experience was highly research-oriented. I’ve had the opportunity to work with different bacteria cultures and determine the effectiveness of hand washing and the effectiveness of antibiotics in killing those bacteria. From classifying bacteria into gram-negative and gram-positive to finding why my hypothesis was wrong, I’ve valued every moment in the laboratory with my friends and instructor. The research was one of the reasons that influenced my decision to pursue my studies in the US. I am actively applying to incredible research internships where I can get my first official research experience. In conclusion, improving the quality of healthcare in my country is my lifelong dedication, and I am very much enjoying the process I am going through because I love what I am doing, I love caring for the environment, I love sharing love with people, I love being helpful in my community.
    Manuela Calles Scholarship for Women
    Crenati Foundation Supporting International Students Scholarship
    I am the most passionate feminist 17 years old girl the world has ever ought to house. I am an international student from Africa, and where I come from is entirely different from America. This is my first year in the US and my first year in college. In my country, and more precisely in my ethnic group, the default option of every teenage girl from 15 and above is to get married. In Cameroon, it is customary to get married that early; it is taboo to wait till your mid-20s. In my village, I do not know how often I have experienced a woman's death due to childbirth. Women prefer to deliver at home with the aid of other non-professional women rather than going to the hospital. This is due to the cultural mentalities surrounding this subject of women being consulted or treated by male doctors in my culture. Most of the doctors in my village are males, and the females are regarded as incompetent. When I was 9, my aunty died after giving birth to my cousin at her home. I know this sounds crazy, but it is a genuinely authentic traumatic experience I had to go through. It was at that moment that I made medicine a goal. My goal later developed into a passion, and now here I am in the United States, majoring in Biology with a pre-med concentration. Female rights and female well-being are my true passion. No other aunty will die upon giving birth in my village, and no more pain and trauma! Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these dissimilarities among us. Everyone has something to be grateful for and look forward to. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won't let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I forget I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me is strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married and live the life I am fighting against. If my application were granted, it would be like removing a huge weight from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to hope for their dreams becoming true.
    @Carle100 National Scholarship Month Scholarship
    Mohamed Magdi Taha Memorial Scholarship
    I am the most passionate feminist 17 years old girl the world has ever ought to house. I am an international student from Africa, and where I come from is entirely different from America. This is my first year in the US and my first year in college. In my country, and more precisely in my ethnic group, the default option of every teenage girl from 15 and above is to get married. In Cameroon, it is customary to get married that early; it is taboo to wait till your mid-20s. In my village, I do not know how often I have experienced a woman's death due to childbirth. Women prefer to deliver at home with the aid of other non-professional women rather than going to the hospital. This is due to the cultural mentalities surrounding this subject of women being consulted or treated by male doctors in my culture. Most of the doctors in my village are males, and the females are regarded as incompetent. When I was 9, my aunty died after giving birth to my cousin at her home. I know this sounds crazy, but it is a genuinely true traumatic experience I had to go through. It was at that moment that I made medicine a goal. My goal later developed into a passion, and now here I am in the United States, majoring in Biology with a pre-med concentration. Female rights and female well-being are my true passion. No other aunty will die upon giving birth in my village, and no more pain and trauma! Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these dissimilarities among us. Everyone has something to be grateful for and look forward to. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won't let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I forget I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me is strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married and live the life I am fighting against. If my application were granted, it would be like removing a huge weight from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to hope for their dreams becoming true.
    Trees for Tuition Scholarship Fund
    I am the most passionate feminist 17 years old girl the world has ever ought to house. I am an international student from Africa, and where I come from is entirely different from America. This is my first year in the US and my first year in college. In my country, and more precisely in my ethnic group, the default option of every teenage girl from 15 and above is to get married. In Cameroon, it is customary to get married that early; it is taboo to wait till your mid-20s. In my village, I do not know how often I have experienced a woman's death due to childbirth. Women prefer to deliver at home with the aid of other non-professional women rather than going to the hospital. This is due to the cultural mentalities surrounding this subject of women being consulted or treated by male doctors in my culture. Most of the doctors in my village are males, and the females are regarded as incompetent. When I was 9, my aunty died after giving birth to my cousin at her home. I know this sounds crazy, but it is a genuinely true traumatic experience I had to go through. It was at that moment that I made medicine a goal. My goal later developed into a passion, and now here I am in the United States, majoring in Biology with a pre-med concentration. Female rights and female well-being are my true passion. No other aunty will die upon giving birth in my village, and no more pain and trauma! Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these dissimilarities among us. Everyone has something to be grateful for and look forward to. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won't let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I forget I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me is strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Today I worked for a straight 6hours shift as a parking attendant, and yet, tomorrow, I have to submit a highly qualified biology lab report. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married and live the life I am fighting against. If my application were granted, it would be like removing a huge weight from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to be stronger and more hopeful for their ambitions.
    Robert F. Lawson Fund for Careers that Care
    I am the most passionate feminist 17 years old girl the world has ever ought to house. I am an international student from Africa, and where I come from is entirely different from America. This is my first year in the US and my first year in college. In my country, and more precisely in my ethnic group, the default option of every teenage girl from 15 and above is to get married. In Cameroon, it is customary to get married that early; it is taboo to wait till your mid-20s. In my village, I do not know how often I have experienced a woman's death due to childbirth. Women prefer to deliver at home with the aid of other non-professional women rather than going to the hospital. This is due to the cultural mentalities surrounding this subject of women being consulted or treated by male doctors in my culture. Most of the doctors in my village are males, and the females are regarded as incompetent. When I was 9, my aunty died after giving birth to my cousin at her home. I know this sounds crazy, but it is a genuinely true traumatic experience I had to go through. It was at that moment that I made medicine a goal. My goal later developed into a passion, and now here I am in the United States, majoring in Biology with a pre-med concentration. Female rights and female well-being are my true passion. No other aunty will die upon giving birth in my village, and no more pain and trauma! Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these dissimilarities among us. Everyone has something to be grateful for and look forward to. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won't let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I forget I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me is strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Today I worked for a straight 6hours shift as a parking attendant, and yet, tomorrow, I have to submit a highly qualified biology lab report. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married and live the life I am fighting against. If my application were granted, it would be like removing a huge weight from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to be stronger and more hopeful for their ambitions.
    Female Empowerment Scholarship
    I am the most passionate feminist 17 years old girl the world has ever ought to see. I am an international student from Africa, and where I come from is entirely different from America. This is my first year in the US as a whole and my first year in college. In my country, and more precisely in my ethnic group, the default option of every teenage girl from 15 and above is to get married. In Cameroon, it is customary to get married that early, and It is actually taboo to wait till your mid-20s for girls. I do not know how often I have experienced a woman's death due to child delivery in my village. Women prefer to deliver at home with the aid of other non-professional women rather than going to the hospital. This is due to the cultural mentalities surrounding this subject of women being consulted or treated by male doctors in my culture. Most of the doctors in my village are males, and the females are regarded as incompetent. When I was 9, my aunty died after giving birth to my cousin at her home. I know this sounds crazy, but it is a genuinely true traumatic experience I had to go through. It was at that moment that I made medicine a goal. My goal later developed into a passion, and now here I am in the United States, majoring in Biology with a pre-med major. Female rights and opportunities are my true passion. No other aunty will die upon giving birth in my village, and no more pain and trauma! Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these distinctions among us. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won't let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I forget I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me has been strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Today I worked for a straight 6hours shift as a parking attendant, and yet, tomorrow, I am required to submit a highly qualified biology lab report. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married and live the life I am trying to help young girls from my community not to fall into. If my application were granted, a huge weight would be removed from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to be stronger and more hopeful for their ambitions.
    Sikora Drake STEM Scholarship
    It is easy for anyone pre-med student to say that Medicine is their passion when they have a perfect GPA, MCAT score, exceptional extracurriculars and volunteering activities. Still, above all, it is easier to convince medical schools’ admission committee when you are a tall, handsome young white man. Why so? Why a man? Why a white man? Why not me? Well, the answer is simple; Society. I decided to pick Biology as my major primarily to prove myself and Society wrong. “Look at this black Muslim woman; she’s a doctor!” that is the scene I am hurriedly waiting for. Now, I am intersectional and not regretful of any of my identities. I know and believe in myself when it comes to using my uniqueness to compel me to beautiful places I could have never fantasised about. Unfortunately, as an international Student from Africa, I face severe financial hardships. Two hours ago, I finished a straight 6hours shift as a parking attendant, and yet, I have one day left to submit a highly qualified biology lab report. Learning and understanding the concepts in Biology is not a problem; getting the money to learn those concepts is my real problem, a problem that constantly hunts me. If I fail to graduate, my default option is to get married. Even though in America, getting married at 17 is illegal and unethical, in Cameroon, it is widespread, especially in my ethnic group culture, Fulani. Culture is me; I make up culture. And the world needs me; the world needs culture. The worlds need diversity. That is why among all the 7 billion people that exist on this planet, more than 420 billion different variants of DNA are possible. Everyone is unique, everyone Is needed, and everyone makes up culture. The beauty of the world is these distinctions among us. Each and every one of us has something to be grateful for and something to look forward to. Even though I may be part of a minority, I won’t let that stop me from growing and helping other young girls see their potential. I have gone through a lot of despair; Racism, Islamophobia, social isolation, sexism, and the list is remarkably long. At 17 years old, I have gone through so much that sometimes I omit I am just a teenager. I will not give up until I do! The doctor in me is strong enough to have made it so far and will not give up now. If my application were granted, It would be like removing a huge weight from my back. I will be forever grateful, and I shall not fail you. Thank you for enabling students like me to be stronger and more hopeful for their ambitions.
    Maggie's Way- International Woman’s Scholarship
    Winner
    Never could I imagine someone else had the same struggles as I did. Malgorzata and I are very much alike on several grounds. I moved to the US a few months ago to further my studies in medicine. As a Cameroonian from the Fulani tribe, my identity as a female destined me to marry by the age of 18. Culturally I couldn’t do anything to stop this from happening unless I found a way to move out of my country and further my education without bordering my father. My father is the one who makes financial decisions in my family. I struggled on my own and applied to numerous colleges across the US, and upon graduation from high school, I got accepted into 7 different colleges. Georgia State University offered me the most generous scholarship I needed to persuade my father to let me work on my dreams before getting married. Unfortunately, my father’s mind changed, and he will not be able to assist me financially in paying my tuition anymore. I took a part-time job hoping to save enough money to ensure my tuition payment for the spring 2023 semester, but I am afraid this will not be sufficient. I am not yet willing to give up on my dreams! I have to work! And I will work hard and smart. My choices now are moving back to my country and getting married to a man I do not know or finding a way to pay for my tuition and achieve my dreams, becoming financially independent and acquiring freedom. Now, It is essential to understand how the cultural society I live in categorizes people like me. Many of my cousins and friends aged 16-18 are already married or a getting married soon. As a female, getting married is the default and best option provided. By moving to the US, I phase a lot of marginalization and discrimination from the people from my own family and ethnic group. “A girl with no respect.” “She follows western culture” and “No man will ever want to marry her” are the gossips and rumours that are now propagated about me within my family and community. Medicine is my passion, and that’s all I ask for. My whole spirit, soul and body are driven towards that one thought of acquiring medical knowledge that I can exercise every day of my life in my community and within the entire earth globe. Currently, I am a biology major with a pre-med concentration. It is challenging and demanding, but that same thought of me being a MEDICAL DOCTOR wakes me up every morning and motivates me to work as hard as possible. If my application is granted, it will be the most unforgettable experience of my whole life. I need this scholarship. I really do.