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Alexandra Freeman

7255

Bold Points

25x

Nominee

1x

Finalist

Bio

I recently graduated from high school Distinguished with Highest Honors and will be attending Western Kentucky University, where I will be majoring in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a doctor and surgeon. I have also been accepted into WKU's exclusive Honors College, and plan to study abroad as I work toward a second major in Spanish. I will also be minoring in dance. I have taken part in many academic opportunities throughout my high school career as a member of the National Honors Society, National Beta Club, and model UN and model state government events. During high school, I participated in a 4-year hands-on Biomedical Sciences program, which has deepened my passion for medicine and has led me to be accepted into medical programs such as Congress of Future Medical Leaders and the University of Kentucky's Summer Med Camp. This growing passion also encouraged me to start the first high school American Red Cross Club in Kentucky, and I served as President all four years, organizing community service projects. I have also been volunteering with my local EMS to gain experience as I have helped those I work with in real-life emergency situations. This led me to join the Emergency Medical Technician program at my high school, and I graduated with my EMT certification. Through all my volunteer work, I have contributed over 300 hours of community service during high school. I plan to work as an EMT throughout my college career to help pay for my education as I continue to gain experience while giving back to my community.

Education

Western Kentucky University

Bachelor's degree program
2023 - 2027

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Bachelor's degree program

  • Graduate schools of interest:

  • Transfer schools of interest:

  • Majors of interest:

    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
    • Dance
    • Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      To become a Doctor/Surgeon

    • Scooper, Cashier, and Customer Service

      Sweeties Ice Cream Parlor
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Counter/Drive-Thru Cashier

      The Cookout
      2022 – 2022

    Sports

    High School Dance Team

    Varsity
    2019 – Present5 years

    Awards

    • Team Captain
    • 4-year Varsity Letterman
    • Region Champions

    All-Star Dance Team

    Club
    2011 – Present13 years

    Awards

    • I have annually auditioned for and made my dance studio's competitive dance team since the age of 6. We compete in several competitions in the multi-state region each year and have won many 1st Place and Grand Champion awards.

    Universal Dance Association

    Varsity
    2022 – Present2 years

    Awards

    • All-American Dancer

    Research

    • Honors

      Corbin High School — Graduating Distinguished with Highest Honors (4.5 GPA and above on a 4.0 scale
      2019 – Present
    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other

      CHS Senior Awards — EMT Student of the Year award
      2023 – Present
    • Leadership Scholarship

      Leadership Tri-County — Sandi Curd Scholarship recipient - regional award for outstanding academic achievement, demonstrated leadership in school and community, and commitment to service
      2023 – Present
    • Honors College

      Western Kentucky University — Accepted into WKU’s exclusive Mahurin Honors College to participate in the program throughout my college career. MHC offers special opportunities, such as an extensive study abroad program, and research and thesis opportunities as an undergraduate.
      2023 – Present
    • AP/Honors/Dual Credit

      CHS/UC/EKU — Graduating with 30+ hours of college credit
      2019 – Present
    • Health/Medical Preparatory Programs

      Biomedical Sciences student — I have performed dissections of a cow eye, cat, fetal pig, sheep brain, and pig heart. I have also observed human dissections in the University of Kentucky Medical School’s cadaver lab, and work with a digital cadaver table.
      2019 – Present
    • Health/Medical Preparatory Programs

      PLTW Biomedical Sciences — Conducted DNA research using methods such as gel electrophoresis, separating DNA via micropipette and centrifuge, and collecting bacterial cultures. Research was done alongside case studies of patients with meningitis and increased genetic risk of cancer.
      2021 – Present
    • Health/Medical Preparatory Programs

      Project Lead the Way Biomedical Sciences — Researched real-life medical cases, preparing casework studies and developing and presenting diagnosis
      2019 – Present
    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other

      Corbin Area Technology Center — While preparing to receive my EMT certification I have studied medical termonology, proper procedure, and hands-on emergency training including receiving my CPR/AED certification, manually taking vital signs, assessing the ABCs of emergency care, and more
      2019 – Present
    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other

      University of Kentucky Medical Camp — Selected as 1 of 20 high school students from across the state to participate in a structured educational curriculum with various hands-on activities and clinical observation opportunities including conducting scientific experiments.
      2021 – 2022

    Arts

    • Professional Dance Companies

      Dance
      I auditioned for and was cast in productions of The Nutcracker one year with the Lexington Ballet Company, and three years with the Moscow Ballet.
      2011 – Present
    • Gail Fredricks School of Dance

      Dance
      I began dance classes at the age of 5 with a studio of over 400 students. I perform numerous dances (ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, lyrical, contemporary, hip hop) in the annual recital each year, performing approximately 45 dances over the course of 5 performances during the 3 day recital period each year.
      2010 – Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Organizer — Organized a Turkey Drive and collected food items to donate complete Thanksgiving meals to families in need in the surrounding 8 county area
      2021 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      Organizer — Organized a donation drive for local hospital and collected over 700 comfort items for patients, family, and staff
      2020 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      Peer Tutor — Peer Tutor for Biomedical Science and Spanish classes
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Redhound Scholar — Senior Co-Op program - cooperative education through work and volunteering
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Various — I have volunteered for many community service projects through my school clubs and individually. Through all of my volunteering, I have accumulated over 300 hours of community service so far during in high school.
      2019 – Present
    • Advocacy

      YMCA Young Kentuckians Advocacy Program (YKAP) — Selected as a member of Kentucky high school students’ brightest and boldest young minds to connect and work together to make a positive change in state and local communities through an advanced curriculum of workshops, networking, and special projects.
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Whitley County EMS — I volunteer and ride along on emergency calls assisting EMTs
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      American Red Cross — I started a Red Cross Club at my High School. I serve as club President, and have organized many community service events.
      2019 – Present

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Henry Respert Alzheimer's and Dementia Awareness Scholarship
    My grandfather knew everything. At least that’s what it seemed like to me as a kid. He was a college professor with a brilliant mind. He was also an avid reader, and his house was filled with so many books he could start his own library. He loved to joke and tease and played with words from his vast vocabulary. He was definitely the person you wanted on your trivia team! He was a big bear of a man, large in stature as well as personality, and although his students were intimidated, they still adored him. But to me, he was Grandpa - a gentle giant, funny, kind, and caring. Then one day, my grandfather came to visit, and something was off. Instead of the jovial bear of a man I knew, he seemed drawn and shrunken, and shuffled his feet like a little old man. My mother found out about a medical procedure he was having and needed to be driven home afterward due to the anesthesia, but she had to argue with him to let her drive him home and stay the night with him as the doctors had instructed. When we walked into his house, we knew something was terribly wrong. He was usually a tidy man, but his house was such a mess it was unhealthy. We began making trips to help with housecleaning, thinking that he was just not physically able. But he kept having falls, and we discovered he was doing unsafe things like leaving on gas burners unattended. We were afraid to leave him alone, so we brought him to our house. That’s when his mental state became an obvious issue. He wouldn’t sleep, paced, thought he was being held prisoner, and kept trying to get out of the house. At one point, he became angry, started yelling, and tried to climb out my bedroom window. I had no idea what was going on. This wasn’t the man I knew. I started to cry because it both saddened and scared me. One night, he demanded to leave and got out the door with no shirt and bare feet in near-freezing temperatures, and started walking down the street saying he was going to go to the police station to report having been kidnapped. He started repeating words in conversations that didn’t make sense. Then he began walking oddly and we feared he’d had a stroke. After several trips to the doctor, he was finally diagnosed with cancer. A neurologist was consulted, and they explained that the cancer had caused fluid on his brain, but because they didn’t say the specific word “Alzheimer's” he didn’t understand they were telling him that the cancer had caused him to have dementia. The deterioration of his mental state was so drastic it was hard to believe this all happened over the course of just a few months. He had to be put in a long-term care facility, which he hated and complained every day that he wanted to go home. This all happened just as everything was shutting down for Covid, which made it that much worse because we weren’t allowed to be with him when he needed us most. He didn’t understand the isolation – he thought he was in jail. It was terrifying for him and gut-wrenching for my family. He constantly called us, and we couldn’t tell what was real and what was his imagination. Eventually he didn’t even recognize me. We now know that his behavior showed classic symptoms of dementia, but it was surprisingly difficult to get proper care for him in the beginning. Several trips to the ER resulted in diagnoses such as dehydration and urinary tract infections that were treated as minor and he was sent home quickly. Even once he was diagnosed with cancer and it was clear that he needed around-the-clock care due to his diminished mental capacity, the long-term care facility doctor didn’t believe he had dementia and kept trying to send him home. My family had to fight for evaluation by a psychiatrist to prove his need for constant care. We learned from the psychiatrist that intelligent people often hide it well because they use their large vocabulary so people who don’t know them – including medical professionals not trained about dementia – don’t realize the decline from their normal intelligence. When his cancer medication had eroded his esophagus to the point he could no longer eat, the doctors turned to our family for direction on his nutrition. He asked for a feeding tube even though his medical directive from when he was of sound mind clearly stated he hadn’t wanted that. I saw the anguish it caused for my family to have to make his medical decisions. Seeing such a brilliant mind destroyed by the ravages of disease was so heartbreaking that it was almost a relief when he passed away. But of course, that also brought on its own sense of guilt for feeling relieved. Since experiencing the devastation dementia causes first-hand, my family worries when they forget things or don’t feel as sharp as they used to be. Now as a family, we’ve started looking more closely at our eating habits, vitamins and supplements, and mental as well as physical exercises to try to reduce dementia risks. We’ve also become more vigilant about monitoring my older family members for any signs of decreasing mental capacity, as staying connected seems to be key. My grandpa was not the only one in my immediate family to be touched by cancer. Just during the years I was in high school, my other grandfather and my step-grandfather were also diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother had to have her thyroid removed, and my older brother has been diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma. But my grandpa was the only one affected by dementia, and to me it was the scariest, because seeing it change his personality and mental capacity so drastically made me feel helpless. Losing three of my family members and receiving long-term illness diagnoses for two others, all just within the last four years, has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate.  But instead of giving up hope and falling into despair, seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a light, igniting my passion for medicine, and making me determined to become a doctor. It has become my goal to appreciate those I love while possible, as I have learned that loss strikes at a moment’s notice, and it has driven my desire to help make a difference for others in need. It made me work even harder to do well academically, doing more than simply what was required, and taking advanced and dual credit classes, so I graduated from high school Distinguished with Highest Honors (4.5+ GPA) and over 30 hours of college credits. I started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school and served as President all four years, organizing community service projects, and encouraging other students to volunteer. I also took “zero hour” classes that started an hour before the official start of each school day and independent study classes to be able to fit my school’s four-year EMT certification program into my schedule, so that I was able to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. Beginning last summer I sought out an opportunity to volunteer with the local Emergency Medical Services station, riding along on emergency calls and providing hands-on assistance to patients in need. Through all my volunteer work combined, I contributed over 300 hours of community service during my high school years. I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so I can help pay for my education as I gain more experience in the medical field while also continuing to give back to my community. I am moving in this weekend to begin classes at Western Kentucky University to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a doctor, which will allow me to achieve my goals of helping those in need and contributing to society. The drive to excel has also led me to be accepted into WKU’s distinguished Honors College, where I will be able to develop and conduct my own hands-on research projects as an undergraduate. After witnessing the devastating effects dementia had on my family, and the struggles with receiving proper diagnosis and appropriate care, I plan to research in the fields of cancer and dementia. As an Honors student, I also plan to study abroad and learn about healthcare systems in other countries to help implement improvements in care outcomes in the US. Receiving this scholarship will help me pursue my passion to become a doctor and help prevent other families from going through the same heartbreak my family has been through experiencing the effects of dementia.
    Joey Anderson Dance & Theater Scholarship
    The sound of music filled my ears. No other sounds reached me - not the cheers of the crowd, not the pounding of my heart, not the heavy breaths of my team around me. The vibrations filled me, bouncing around my body like a pinball machine. Little thought went into the movements that carried me through the performance. It was muscle memory. My friends and I had been jumping with nerves just moments before, but now that all washed away. We moved across the stage in unison with the music. And then it was over. Three minutes finished like a snap of the fingers. Dance has become a second home to me. I couldn’t imagine my life without it. But it wasn’t always this way. I began dancing at the age of five and enjoyed the classes until my first recital. I performed the choreography, but I became so focused on doing it correctly that I stared at one spot on the floor the entire time. I was encouraged to try out for the competitive team the following year. The fear of not doing everything perfectly was overwhelming, but I learned to take it one step at a time, making the team, practicing until it was muscle memory, and eventually enjoying performing rather than being afraid of making mistakes. My team and I went on to become Grand Champions. Since then, I performed with professional ballet companies and made my high school’s varsity dance team all four years, performing at football and basketball games and winning Regional Championships. I was team Captain my senior year and was also awarded UDA All-American Dancer. I’ve continued to compete with my studio’s competitive team at the same time. I still perform at that annual recital, only now, instead of one terrified performance, I perform (and enjoy!) 45-50 dances over the 3-day recital. This year will be my 13th recital. Recently I began reflecting on how I have developed from the shy, perfectionist little girl all those years ago. Had I not left my comfort zone, I never would have understood that making mistakes creates the opportunity to learn. I realized taking direction and constructive criticism enables me to improve. Now I enjoy stepping out of my comfort zone, seeking out challenges, and pushing myself to do more because I know that I can. Dance taught me confidence, teamwork, independence, and leadership skills. I am passionate about dance because it allowed me to spread my wings, enabling me to follow my dreams. As a result of what I learned through dance, I will be attending Western Kentucky University to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track. I have also been accepted into the Honors College there and will be able to study abroad as I work toward a second major in Spanish. While my ultimate career goal is to become a doctor and surgeon, I plan to audition for WKU’s Dance Team and have declared dance as my minor. Although dance and being a doctor may not seem to go together, they work in perfect harmony for me. I am fascinated by studying the medical world of anatomy and physiology, while dance calms my mind and gives me quiet confidence in my strength. Dance has played a large part in my path to becoming who I am today, and the natural side effect has been skills I can use in my pursuit of becoming a doctor. I am passionate about dance because of how it makes me feel, losing myself in the movement, and finding myself through all it has taught me.
    Coleman for Patriots Scholarship
    Volunteering has been a rewarding part of my high school career. It started because during my high school years, I have had four of my immediate family members diagnosed with cancer, and another diagnosed with a long-term critical illness. Seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a light, igniting my passion to become a doctor to help people in need and inspiring me to seek out volunteer opportunities to make a difference in my community. Overall, I have contributed over 300 hours of community service during high school while maintaining a 4.0+ GPA as an Honors student. During my freshman year, I started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school. This gave me an opportunity to begin giving back to my community while encouraging other students to volunteer. I have served as President all four years, and have organized several community service projects, such as a “Zombie Apocalypse” themed disaster preparedness program for elementary school students, and participating in the International Humanitarian Law Youth Action Campaign raising awareness regarding education during military conflicts. During the pandemic, I organized a donation drive for the local hospital and collected over seven hundred comfort items for patients, families, and medical workers. I also organized a food drive to deliver Thanksgiving meals to underprivileged families in the 8-county surrounding area. Serving as a Blood Donor Ambassador at the local American Red Cross Donation Center, I registered donors and helped them feel comfortable and appreciated throughout their experience. I also enjoy working with younger students while encouraging reading at book drives and teaching dance at clinics. I have also been working towards completing training as an Emergency Medical Technician and will have the opportunity to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. I also volunteer with the local Emergency Medical Services station, which has given me the opportunity to provide life-saving help to patients in real-life emergency situations throughout my community while also supporting those I work alongside during a time of major shortage in healthcare professionals. I now feel an even deeper connection to a field I am extremely passionate about, and I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I will gain more hands-on experience in the medical field while continuing to give back to my community. Volunteering has made a positive impact on my life and has taught me leadership skills and hard work. I have gained experience that I otherwise would not have had, driving me to explore the things I am passionate about. These opportunities have allowed me to enjoy being able to make a difference in the lives of those around me, and the connections I have made have deepened my relationship with my community. I look forward to continuing to give back to my community by helping those in need, both as a volunteer and as a doctor, in the future. While I plan to work as an EMT in college to help pay for my education, this scholarship will allow me to help take the burden of paying for higher education off of my family as I pursue my passion to become a doctor and help make a difference in the world.
    David Foster Memorial Scholarship
    I am blessed to have had a handful of teachers who have shaped my high school experience – from a mentor in my chosen field of study, to a teacher whose wacky “think-outside-the-box” approach made learning fun. But the teacher who has had the biggest impact on my future plans influenced me in ways I never expected. Mr. Goodin is the reason I decided to add a second major when I go to college that I would never have considered otherwise. Medicine is my passion. I will be attending Western Kentucky University beginning this fall to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a doctor and surgeon. So when I first started taking Spanish classes in high school, it was only to fulfill a foreign language requirement. However, I quickly found Mr. Goodin to be the type of teacher who inspires me to learn purely for the sake of learning. He is a very personable teacher, who engages his classes in conversations, developing our educational curiosity. He truly takes an interest in students, asking how things are going in and out of the classroom. He remembers what each student is interested in and follows up to see how we are doing with them later on. His classroom is also physically vibrant, immersive in Spanish cultures, and provokes students to ask questions. Instead of simply lecturing, students learn about foreign countries from around the world, so learning Spanish becomes almost a by-product as he tells stories. The way he explains things and makes sure each student understands makes you feel engaged and opens your mind to a whole world of new cultures. Even things you think might not be of interest, he finds a way to make interesting to discuss and makes you want to learn. I have always enjoyed traveling, and have been all over the US, but I have never been out of the country. Now I have been inspired to travel abroad in college as a result of Mr. Goodin’s classes. During my senior year, I have been a peer tutor in his Spanish I class, which has given me additional time to talk to him about my aspirations. He encouraged me to test into higher-level Spanish courses in college so I will have time to take Spanish as a second major. Since he has experience aiding students abroad with their college entrance essays, I sought out his advice during my admissions process while applying for WKU’s distinguished Mahurin Honors College (a separate, more rigorous application process). I was accepted into the Honors College, which grants me access to special programs, and I strongly feel that his help had a positive impact on my endeavors. As an honors student, I plan to study abroad, immersing myself in other cultures as I work toward a second major in Spanish while learning from medical professionals in other countries as well as in the US. Mr. Goodin makes students want to persevere. I never would have considered pursuing Spanish in college, but his encouragement makes me feel like I’m better at it than I think I am because he is confident in my ability. So from only taking Spanish as a requirement, he is literally the reason I am planning a double major because he made me think new thoughts. With him cheering me on, now I will be an honors student with a second major in Spanish, studying abroad as I pursue my passion to become a doctor.
    Advantech Intelligent Planet Scholarship
    Through technological advances, the world comes together as a smaller place. We are able to communicate with people across the country or around the world, and we can see what is happening anywhere as if we are there. As a student, this was never more evident than through the use of technology to continue classes online during the pandemic closures. Our comfort at home and ability to connect for everyday activities became reliant upon technology. To me, an intelligent plant is a collaboration of all systems across the world. From controlling the comfort of our homes, providing educational opportunities, and allowing work from anywhere, to cleaner air and water, and improvements in our health, an intelligent planet comes together in an integrated way, working together to improve all aspects of life. I have known since the second grade that I want to be a doctor. So technology in healthcare is an important aspect for me. Technology has become integrated throughout healthcare, from booking appointments, accessing test results and patient records, to the medical and surgical procedures themselves. An intelligent planet allows for collaboration between doctors across the world for innovation and medical advancements. Integration across all systems allows not only for efficiency and improvement, but also for improving patients’ lives even at home. Intelligent systems could help patients by monitoring biometrics, administering medicine, making adjustments in treatment and home environments, alerting when problems arise, allowing patients to connect with their doctors from home, and potentially sending help before the patient even realizes they are in trouble. I will be attending Western Kentucky University beginning this fall to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to go to medical school to become a doctor and surgeon. Because of my drive to excel, I have also been accepted into WKU’s distinguished Mahurin Honors College, where I will be able to participate in a research and thesis program as an undergraduate. As an honors student, I also plan to study abroad to immerse myself in other cultures as I minor in Spanish while learning about healthcare systems in other countries to implement ideas to make improvements in healthcare in the US. As I have learned more about the medical field, I have become more aware of the issues in the United States healthcare system that people face every day. With an interest in pursuing a specialty in maternal-fetal medicine and fetal surgery in utero, I have been passionate about the issues within obstetrics for some time, specifically in the high maternal mortality rate stemming from preventable causes. When compared to other wealthy countries, the United States is rated the worst in terms of maternal care. Many complications and deaths reported in maternal and fetal care resulted from delayed treatment or no treatment at all, as well as issues with affordability and efficiency within US hospitals. My vision for an intelligent planet would allow me to have the opportunity to collaborate with doctors in the leading countries for maternal-fetal care and witness how they improve their care outcomes, learning about policies and techniques that could lead to breakthroughs in the United States' healthcare issues. By becoming a doctor and surgeon I hope to be a part of this solution by continuing to seek such innovations and collaborations to improve outcomes.
    Maverick Grill and Saloon Scholarship
    Normal isn’t enough. I want to be extraordinary. Dance calms my mind and gives me quiet confidence in my strength. Studying medicine, observing surgical procedures, and holding organs in my hands I find thrilling. No, I am not a serial killer; I’m a surgeon in the making. I am unique because while many students my age are still undecided about their major, I have known what I wanted to be since the second grade when I announced I wanted to be a doctor for my career day presentation. My passion for medicine was clearly present as I played “doctor” on my stuffed animals, putting bandages on their little legs and using my toy stethoscope. Fortunately, I attend a high school that participates in a four-year biomedical sciences program that offers hands-on experiences with state-of-the-art tools and techniques that are used by medical professionals every day. My family likes to joke with me that they’re not sure if they’re raising a psychopath or a surgeon! I am unique because dance helped me to grow as a person. I began dance classes at the age of 5, joined the competitive team the following year, and have continued to compete and perform, including joining my high school’s varsity dance team as well. Along the way, dance taught me confidence, teamwork, independence, and leadership skills I never would have learned otherwise. I am unique because when my family faced adversity, with my three grandfathers diagnosed with cancer and passing away, my mother hospitalized in the critical care unit, and my brother diagnosed with stage IV lymphoma, all during my high school years, instead of falling into despair, it ignited my determination to become a doctor and help make a difference in the world. I am unique because I decided early on that I wanted to give back to my community. I started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school and have served as President all four years. While most students would prefer to sleep in, I took “zero-hour” classes before the start of each school day so I would have time to fit the four-year ETM certification program into my schedule, and I will graduate from high school with my EMT certification. I also began volunteering with the local Emergency Medical Services station. Through all my volunteer work combined, I have contributed over 300 hours of community service during high school. I plan to work as an EMT while in college, gaining more experience in the medical field while giving back to my community. I am unique because I have creative interests as well as being scientifically minded. I will be attending Western Kentucky University to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a surgeon. I also intend to audition for the dance team and minor in dance. I have also been accepted into WKU’s distinguished Mahurin Honors College, which will allow me to design my academic journey. I will be able to conduct my own hands-on research projects, participate in a thesis program as an undergraduate, and study abroad, immersing myself in other cultures as I minor in Spanish. As an honors student, I will be able to combine my interests that seem unrelated to the medical field, with double minors in dance and Spanish, to create my own unique educational experience. What makes me unique is my combination of interests, having the compassion to give back to my community and the drive to make my own way as I pursue my passion to become a surgeon.
    North Star Dreamers Memorial Scholarship
    In the second grade, I announced I wanted to be a “doggie doctor” for my career day presentation. Over the years as I grew, I realized I wanted to be an M.D. instead of literally a doctor for dogs. But my interest in medicine was clearly present as I played "doctor" on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. Because of my creative interests in visual and performing arts, I considered several pathways as I entered high school before declaring my course of study. I took the introductory course for my school’s engineering program. I loved creating designs and working with 3D printers. My design for a “Mars rover” even won my school’s annual contest! But my heart was still set on medicine, so I chose the Biomedical Sciences pathway. However, my high school years have not easy for my family. My three grandfathers were diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit and continues to battle a chronic illness, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma and still has a long road to recovery ahead. All this adversity within the past four years has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate. But seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a sort of light, re-igniting my passion to become a doctor, and driving my desire to help make a difference for others in need. I joined my school’s four-year EMT program, so I will graduate from high school with my EMT certification, and I have been volunteering with the local Emergency Medical Services station, providing hands-on assistance in emergency situations. I also started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school and have served as President all four years, organizing community service projects to give back to my community while encouraging other students to volunteer. Through all my volunteer work, I have contributed over 300 hours of community service during my high school years while maintaining a 4.0+ GPA. As I advanced through the Biomedical Sciences program, I discovered that I particularly love anatomy and physiology. Learning how human body systems work steered my interest to surgical techniques and possibly biomedical engineering. I will be attending Western Kentucky University to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a surgeon. I have also been accepted into WKU’s distinguished Mahurin Honors College, where I will be able to conduct my own hands-on research and participate in a thesis program as an undergraduate. I also plan to study abroad, immersing myself in other cultures as I work toward a minor in Spanish while learning about healthcare systems in other countries to help make improvements in surgical techniques and outcomes in the US. Dealing with the expenses of healthcare while mourning losses and fighting cancer has added pressure to my family that none should have to endure. But as a middle-income family, it is nearly impossible to qualify for financial aid because of making “too much.” Receiving this scholarship will help me to bridge the gap between the merit aid I have earned and the remainder my family must contribute. While I plan to work as an EMT in college to help pay for my education, this scholarship will allow me to take the burden of paying for higher education off my family as I pursue my passion to become a surgeon.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    Volunteering has been a rewarding part of my high school career; and overall, I have contributed over three hundred hours of community service during high school. But the past 4 years have not been easy for my family. My three grandfathers were diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma. Losing three of my family members and receiving long-term illness diagnoses for two others, all just within my high school years, has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate. However, instead of giving up hope and falling into despair, seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a sort of light, igniting my passion to become a doctor to help people in need and inspiring me to seek out volunteer opportunities to become a participant in community service. During my freshman year, I started the first high school American Red Cross Club in Kentucky. This gave me an opportunity to begin giving back to my community while encouraging other students to volunteer. I have served as President all four years, and have organized several community service events such as a “Zombie Apocalypse” themed disaster preparedness program for elementary school students. During the pandemic, I organized a donation drive for the local hospital and collected over seven hundred comfort items for patients, families, and medical workers. I also organized a food drive to deliver Thanksgiving meals to needy families in the 8-county surrounding area. Serving as a Blood Donor Ambassador at the local American Red Cross Donation Center, I registered donors and helped them feel comfortable and appreciated throughout their experience. I also enjoy working with younger students while encouraging reading at book drives and teaching dance at clinics. I have also been working towards completing training as an Emergency Medical Technician and will have the chance to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. Last summer I began volunteering with the local Emergency Medical Services station, which has given me the opportunity to provide life-saving help to patients in real-life emergency situations throughout my community while also supporting those I work alongside during a time of major shortage in healthcare professionals. I now feel an even deeper connection to a field I am extremely passionate about, and I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can help pay for my education as I gain more experience in the medical field while continuing to give back to my community. Volunteering has made a positive impact on my life and has taught me leadership skills and hard work. I have gained experience that I otherwise would not have had, driving me to explore the things I am passionate about. These opportunities have allowed me to enjoy being able to make a difference in the lives of those around me, and the connections I have made have deepened my relationship with my community. I look forward to continuing to give back to my community by helping those in need in the future. Dealing with the expenses of healthcare while mourning losses and fighting cancer has added pressure to my family that none should have to endure. But as a middle-income family, it is nearly impossible to qualify for financial aid because of making “too much.” Receiving this scholarship will allow me to help take the burden of paying for higher education off my family as I pursue my passion to become a doctor.
    Analtha Parr Pell Memorial Scholarship
    While many students my age are still undecided about their major, I have always known what I want to be. In second grade, I announced I wanted to be a “doggie doctor” for my career day presentation. Eventually, I realized that I wanted to be an M.D. instead of a doctor for dogs. However, my interest in medicine was clearly present as I played doctor on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. So a career as a doctor has always been my passion. I am fortunate to attend a high school that participates in Project Lead the Way’s four-year Biomedical Sciences program, which offers hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and techniques that are used by medical professionals in hospitals and labs every day. These experiences have opened the door to other opportunities for me and have allowed me to learn early that I truly enjoy the medical profession. But the past 4 years have not been easy for my family. My three grandfathers were diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit and continues to battle a chronic illness, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma and still has a long road to recovery ahead. Losing three of my family members and receiving long-term illness diagnoses for two others, all just within my high school years, has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate. Instead of giving up hope and falling into despair, seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a sort of light, igniting my passion to become a doctor. It made me work even harder to do well academically, taking advanced and dual credit classes. I started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school and have served as President all four years, organizing community service projects and encouraging other students to volunteer. I have taken “zero-hour” classes that start an hour before school each day and independent study classes to be able to fit my school’s four-year EMT program into my schedule, so I will be able to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. Last summer I sought out an opportunity to volunteer with the local Emergency Medical Services station. I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can help pay for my education as I gain more experience in the medical field while continuing to give back to my community. I will be attending Western Kentucky University beginning this fall to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a doctor. The drive to excel has also led me to be accepted into WKU’s exclusive Honors College, where I will be able to conduct hands-on research and participate in a thesis program as an undergraduate. I also plan to study abroad, working toward a minor in Spanish while learning about healthcare systems in other countries to help make improvements in healthcare in the US. Dealing with the expenses of healthcare while mourning losses and fighting cancer has added pressure to my family that none should have to endure. But as a middle-income family, it is nearly impossible to qualify for financial aid because of making “too much.” Receiving this scholarship will allow me to help take the burden of paying for higher education off my family as I pursue my passion to become a doctor.
    Dante Luca Scholarship
    While many students my age are still undecided about their major, I have always known what I want to be. In second grade, I announced I wanted to be a “doggie doctor” for my career day presentation. Eventually, I realized that I wanted to be an M.D. instead of literally a doctor for dogs. However, my interest in medicine was clearly present as I played doctor on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. So a career as a doctor has always been my passion. I am fortunate to attend a high school that participates in Project Lead the Way’s four-year Biomedical Sciences program, which offers hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and techniques that are used by medical professionals in hospitals and labs every day. These experiences have also opened the door to other opportunities for me, such as being 1 of 20 high school students selected from across the state for the University of Kentucky’s Summer Medical Camp (a three-week program that provides hands-on activities, clinical observation, and professional shadowing), and being nominated to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders (an honors program for future physicians and medical scientists, with notable guest speakers and observation of real-life surgical procedures). My family likes to joke with me that they’re not sure if they’re raising a psychopath because I get excited about observing surgical demonstrations. (No, I am not a serial killer, I’m a surgeon in the making!) But the past 4 years have not been easy for my family. My three grandfathers were diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit and continues to battle a chronic illness, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma, went through six months of chemotherapy, and still has a long road to recovery ahead. Losing three of my family members and receiving long-term illness diagnoses for two others, all just within my high school years, has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate. Instead of giving up hope and falling into despair, seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a sort of light, igniting my passion to become a doctor and surgeon. It made me work even harder to do well academically, doing more than simply what was required, and taking advanced and dual credit classes. I started the first American Red Cross Club in Kentucky at my high school and have served as President all four years, organizing community service events and encouraging other students to volunteer. I have taken “zero-hour” classes that start an hour before the official start of school each day and independent study classes to be able to fit my school’s four-year EMT certification program into my schedule, so I will be able to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. Last summer I sought out an opportunity to volunteer with the local Emergency Medical Services station. The hands-on experience I have gained while riding-along and assisting on emergent calls has further confirmed my calling for medicine and my ability to handle emergency situations. Proving myself through this volunteer work, I’ve already been offered a job as soon as I graduate, and I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can help pay for my education as I gain more experience in the medical field while also continuing to give back my community. Determination has allowed me to flourish while pursuing my passions. I will be attending Western Kentucky University beginning this fall to pursue a degree in biology on a pre-med track with plans to continue to medical school to become a doctor, which will allow me to achieve my goals of helping those in need and contributing to society. The drive to excel has also led me to be accepted into WKU’s exclusive Mahurin Honors College, where I will be able to conduct my own hands-on research projects and participate in a thesis program as an undergraduate. As an honors student, I plan to study abroad in Spain as I immerse myself in other cultures while I work toward a minor in Spanish and learn about healthcare systems in other countries to help make improvements in healthcare in the US. Dealing with the expenses of healthcare while mourning losses and fighting cancer has added pressure to my family that none should have to endure. But as a middle-income family, it is nearly impossible to qualify for financial aid because of making “too much.” Receiving this scholarship will allow me to help take the burden of paying for higher education off my family as I pursue my passion to become a doctor.
    Future Is Female Inc. Scholarship
    Like many people, I used to think of feminism with almost a negative connotation – as if being a feminist means being angry, anti-men, bra-burning, and not acting “girly.” But I came to understand that feminism just means promoting equality for women, and I realized I want to promote that too. I never particularly considered myself as advocating for issues. It was simply seeing things that needed to be done, and doing them. I started the first high school American Red Cross Club in Kentucky as an opportunity to give back to my community and have served as President all four years. I’ve organized community service events such as hospital donation drives and Thanksgiving food drives. So when I learned of period poverty, I was driven to address this issue. Like other female students, I fear the dreaded “walk of shame” in the event I am caught unprepared for my period while in class and having to walk across school to my car to get period products, hoping that nothing shows through my clothes which would lead to further humiliation. But I learned that for many women, it’s more than a humiliating walk. Because of the lack of affordability, one in three low-income women have used items such as toilet paper, newspaper, or socks for period products, or have had to use products well beyond their intended usage. This is particularly an issue for low-income areas, homeless women, and victims of domestic abuse. So I organized “The Flow Initiative” drive during March in recognition of Women’s History Month to donate period products, bras, and clothing to a local domestic abuse shelter. I’ve known since the second grade that I wanted to be a doctor. This has been reinforced during my high school years, which have not been easy for my family. My grandfathers were diagnosed with cancer and passed away, my mother was hospitalized and battles a critical illness, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of lymphoma. Seeing the doctors at work with my family further ignited my determination to become a doctor and help other families. But coming from a middle-income family we do not qualify for assistance, so the last four years have been difficult financially as well as emotionally. Therefore, applying for scholarships has become a necessity to help cover the costs of my higher education. As I learned more about the medical field, I became inspired by Elizabeth Blackwell, who became the first female doctor in America in 1849. She faced gender discrimination and obstacles throughout her career, but she opened her own practice in obstetrics and gynecology, which eventually became a full-scale hospital. Dr. Blackwell staffed it with women only, and it served as a medical training center helping other women become medical professionals. My dream is to be a surgeon, and with an interest in pursuing a specialty in maternal-fetal medicine, I have been passionate about the issues within obstetrics for some time. When compared to other wealthy countries, the United States is rated the worst in terms of maternal care, with one of the highest maternal mortality rates stemming from preventable causes. While studying abroad as an honors student, I will have the opportunity to work alongside doctors in the leading countries for maternal-fetal care in the hopes of helping bring improvements to the United States’ obstetrical issues. My parents taught me that I could do anything boys could do and not to let anything stop me because I'm “just a girl. By becoming a maternal-fetal surgeon, I will be working to literally save women’s lives.
    Cat Zingano Overcoming Loss Scholarship
    Loss of a loved one is hard to imagine ever affecting you directly. It always seems like something that is so distant, something other people go through but never yourself. That is, until it does happen. Loss strikes hard, and in my case, several times in a row.  The past 4 years have not been easy for my family. The summer before my freshman year, my step-grandfather was diagnosed with cancer and 6 weeks later he was gone. A few weeks later, my mother was sent to the emergency room on the day of my school’s Freshman Open House. She was hospitalized in the critical care unit for a week and continues to battle a chronic illness to this day. My sophomore year, one of my grandfathers was also diagnosed with cancer, leaving my family to handle all his medical and financial arrangements. The cancer caused him to develop dementia-like symptoms and to see such a brilliant mind waste away was the most heartbreaking, especially since this was during the pandemic so we were not able to be by his side when he passed away. During my junior year, my older brother came home for Thanksgiving with a lump in his neck, which turned out to be stage IV of a rare form of cancer. He had to move back home, underwent 6 months of chemo, and still has a long road to recovery ahead. While he was going through chemo, my other grandfather passed away suddenly from a heart-attack one afternoon. Each of these has flipped our world upside-down, forever changing our lives. Losing not just one of my family members, but three, and receiving long-term illness diagnoses for two others, all just within my high school years, has left a whirlwind of emotions that I continue to struggle to navigate. But instead of giving up hope and falling into despair and depression, it has given me the strength to fight for my future. It has become my goal to appreciate those that I love while possible, as I have learned that loss strikes at a moment’s notice. And it has driven my passion to help make a difference for others in medical need. As somber as visiting someone in the hospital is, seeing the medical professionals at work with my family acted as a sort of light, igniting my desire to become a doctor and surgeon. Although I had been interested in the medical field early on and had entered my school’s biomedical sciences program beginning my freshman year, witnessing these losses and critical illnesses has given me the strength to fight for my dreams of becoming a doctor and helping other families. It made me work even harder to do well academically, taking advanced and dual credit classes. I started an American Red Cross Club in my high school and have served as President all four years, organizing community events and encouraging other students to volunteer. I’ve taken classes as independent studies, giving me time to add my school’s EMT program to my schedule so I will graduate from high school with my EMT certification, allowing me to give back to my community and increase my experience in the medical field while working as an EMT throughout college and medical school. This passion and drive to go above and beyond has led me to be accepted not only into my dream university, but to also be accepted into their exclusive Honors College. This grants me access to special programs to further my education--such as conducting research in fields like cancer, which ravaged my family the last few years. It also gives me access to studying abroad to learn from medical professionals in other countries in search of ways to improve healthcare in the US as I immerse myself in other cultures to minor in Spanish. All of these plans are part of my fight to go on to medical school and become a doctor, which will allow me to achieve my goals of helping those in need and contributing to society. The added financial stress of medical bills has only made this journey more difficult for my family. Dealing with the expenses of health care while mourning losses and fighting cancer has added pressure that no family should have to endure. As a middle-income family, paying for college is difficult, but it is nearly impossible to qualify for aid because of making “too much.” So, I have been working hard to earn scholarships to help take the burden of paying for higher education (college and medical school) off of my family. Receiving this scholarship will allow me to help support my family, which has become extremely important to me in light of this adversity, as I fight to pursue my passion to become a doctor.
    Blaine Sandoval Young American Scholarship
    Normal isn’t enough. I want to be extraordinary. My determination in pursuing what I love has driven me to grow as a person. From being a shy little girl when I started dance classes at the age of 5, dance helped me develop more confidence in myself. I joined the competitive team the next year, and have continued to be a dedicated dancer through my studio’s classes, all-star competition team, and as captain of my high school’s varsity dance team. I have learned to step out of my comfort zone, seek out new opportunities, and push myself to do more than just what was required. As I strive to go above and beyond in everything I do, I started setting bigger goals and sought out more advanced classes, I am fortunate to attend a school that participates in a 4-year hands-on biomedical science program, which has given me opportunities most high school students don’t have, and enabling me to follow my growing passion for becoming a doctor and surgeon. I have a better than 4.0 GPA weighted with advanced classes, earned over thirty hours of college dual credit, and serve as a peer tutor. Early on I decided to seek out volunteer opportunities. During my freshman year, I started the first high school American Red Cross Club in Kentucky as an opportunity to give back to my community while encouraging other students to volunteer. I have served as President all four years and have organized many volunteer events through the club. I have also volunteered individually and have organized events such as a donation drive for the local hospital, collecting over 700 comfort items for patients, families, and staff. I also organized a food drive to donate complete Thanksgiving meals to families in need in the surrounding 8-county area. In total, I have over 300 hours of community service thus far in high school. Throughout my high school career, I have taken “zero-hour” classes before the start of school each day and several independent studies to make time in my schedule to take part in an additional four-year program my school offers for EMT training. I will have the opportunity to graduate this spring with my EMT certification, so I started volunteering with my local EMS service. This hands-on experience in real-life situations has further confirmed my calling for medicine and my ability to handle emergency situations, so I know I will be able to persevere in my pursuit of a medical career. I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can continue to gain experience and contribute to my community. Determination has allowed me to flourish while pursuing my passions. Beginning this fall I will be attending Western Kentucky University, majoring in biology on a pre-med track. I have been accepted into WKU's Honors College, where I will have the opportunity to conduct hands-on research and complete a thesis as an undergraduate before going on to medical school. I also plan to study abroad a semester in Spain for a minor in Spanish as I learn about other countries’ healthcare systems. My high school years have not been easy for my family. All (3) of my grandfathers (who are military veterans) passed away from cancer, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV Lymphoma. Coming from a middle-income family, we do not qualify for assistance, so the last four years have been difficult financially as well as emotionally. Receiving this scholarship will help me pursue my dreams.
    Athletics Scholarship
    I couldn’t imagine my life without dance. Although I was nervous when I started dancing at age five, I quickly came to enjoy performing and began competing after my first year. Dance has allowed me to become more confident in myself, teaching me to step out of my comfort zone and seek out new opportunities. I have learned to push myself to do more, which has allowed me to become a better leader and teammate. Challenging myself to go above and beyond applies not only to dance but to other aspects of my life as well. Although I have always been a good student, I started setting bigger goals in order to do more than just what was required. I sought out more advanced classes, enabling me to follow my growing passion for becoming a doctor. While my confidence grew, I also developed leadership skills. As a senior, I have become a role model for younger students as previous seniors were once models for me. On my dance teams, this means keeping a positive attitude when things get hard, rallying the team together, and helping others improve while also working on myself. In school, this translates to helping other students find their way through their own challenges and become the best they can be. As a freshman, I sought out new ways to give back to my community and encourage others to get involved as well. I founded an American Red Cross Club at my high school, where I serve as President and have organized many volunteer events. Alongside leadership also comes teamwork. Growing up on a competitive dance team taught me to work with my teammates so that we could perform to the best of our ability. In the medical field, it is also exceedingly important to be able to work with other professionals and provide the best treatment possible to patients. As I have been training to graduate with my EMT certification, I have been volunteering at my local Emergency Medical Services station. Riding along on emergency calls has taught me the importance of working together with my partners to efficiently provide life-saving care. While dance has taught me teamwork, it has also led me to be independent. I have driven myself to improve physically outside of practice, finding joy in fitness. In my academics, being independent has encouraged me to do extra work outside of class and excel in learning. I have taken several independent studies, college dual credit classes, “zero-hour” classes before the start of school each day, and serve as a peer tutor. Being independent has created reliability in myself, continuing to expect more of myself and rise above challenges. Dance has played a large part in my path to becoming who I am today. Developing from the shy little girl I was years ago, I learned to grow and adapt. Had I not stepped outside of my comfort zone, I would never have had the important lessons that come with being an athlete.
    Connie Konatsotis Scholarship
    Growing up, my parents taught me I could be anything I wanted if I set my mind to it and did the work. They taught me not to let “being a girl” prevent me from pursuing my interests and doing the best I could – whether in academics, in “girly” things, or in areas that were male-dominated. So while many students my age are still undecided about their major, I have always known what I want to be. In second grade, I announced I wanted to be a “doggie doctor” for my career day presentation. Eventually, I decided treating pets wasn’t the right choice for me; however, my interest in medicine was clearly present as I played doctor on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. I also wanted to be a princess, but was satisfied with becoming a ballerina instead. I began dancing at the age of 5, joined the competitive team the next year, and have continued to be a dedicated dancer through my studio’s classes, All-Star competition team, and my school’s varsity dance team ever since. Although dance and being a doctor may not seem to go together, they have been in perfect harmony for me. Dance calms my mind and gives me quiet confidence in my strength. I enjoy the physical activity and the healthy lifestyle of being a dancer, while also being fascinated by studying the medical world of anatomy and physiology. So a career in STEAM has always been my passion. I am excited to continue my education in pursuit of becoming a doctor and surgeon as I study biology with a pre-med focus, and have the opportunity to conduct hands-on research and complete a thesis as an undergraduate before going on to medical school. I also plan to audition for the collegiate dance team, and to study abroad to continue my education in foreign language and experience new cultures. As I have become more involved in the medical community over the last four years, I have also become more aware of the issues in the United States’ healthcare system that people face every day. Having grown up in a largely poor area, I have witnessed how unaffordable healthcare causes people to not receive the care they need. I’ve learned that the United States has regularly been ranked among the worst in comparison to other developed countries in affordability, efficiency, and outcomes. Another issue I have researched more specifically is the high maternal mortality rate stemming from preventable causes within the US. With an interest in pursuing a specialty in maternal-fetal medicine and studying fetal surgery, I have been passionate about the issues within obstetrics for some time. While studying abroad, I hope to learn how other countries prevent these issues. By becoming a doctor and surgeon, and implementing ideas in the United States in an effort to make improvements, I hope to be a part of the solution. My high school years have not been easy for my family. All (3) of my grandfathers passed away from cancer, my mother was hospitalized in the critical care unit and continues to battle a chronic illness, and my older brother was diagnosed with stage IV of a rare form of cancer and underwent 6 months of chemo. Coming from a middle-income family, we do not qualify for assistance, so the last four years have been difficult financially as well as emotionally. Therefore, I am applying for this scholarship to help with the cost of 8 years of education to pursue my dream career.
    Freddie L Brown Sr. Scholarship
    Growing up in a witty, sarcastic family, I was quick to learn to keep up with my clever relatives in order to survive everyday interactions. Good-natured bantering is how my family shows love for each other. It brings a smile to my face if I’ve had a bad day. If my brother and I had been fighting it was a sure way to end squabbling and made it difficult to stay mad at each other. And even if we were in trouble, it was a way to lighten the mood to let us know we were still loved. Silly jokes and teasing humor often bring about curious looks from bystanders. Frequently I have to explain to friends that if my family doesn’t mess with them, it means they don’t like them, so their merciless heckling is a good thing. When I was younger, it was hard for me to understand that others didn’t have this kind of influence in their lives. This wit was all I had known, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything. During my fifth-grade year, I participated in my first-ever writing contest. From there, my passion for storytelling only grew stronger. Entering high school, I was pleased to find a creative writing class available and eagerly signed up. I was among many upperclassmen and was intimidated at first, but my creative mind flourished in the entertaining environment my teacher developed both in and out of the classroom. In many ways, his bazaar sense of humor and wild life tales reminded me of those I heard from my own family. His absurd stories mixed with his inspiring lessons came together to allow my abilities as a writer to thrive. I vividly recall the day he took us outside and sat us down on the grass under the edge of the forest to become “one with nature” for an exercise in which we described life as a tree. One of my favorite, less serious short stories I did, however, was based on a single-sentence prompt that was quick to impress my wacky and chaotic teacher. It goes as follows: Man, this sucks. My mouth is full of dirt and my eyes might as well be shut. Don’t get me wrong, the Idaho dirt is great to be growing in, but when it’s turned into a tasteless sludge after being in your mouth for hours, not so much. Though I guess tasteless sludge is better than the alternative… Occasionally my neighbors and I get the chance to talk. Although, it is muffled like talking through moderately thick walls. Of course, it’s not always so bad. It is mostly when The Picking occurs that sadness strikes everyone again. “It’s a massacre out there!” someone screams in the distance. Or right beside me. It is hard to tell. Suddenly the ground above me rustles and parts, a strange light illuminating my home. The farmer’s calloused hand grips me and pulls me from my hole. The air rushes around me, cool against my skin. I am set in the farmer’s basket, blinded by the new brightness that shines in my eyes. Man, being a potato sucks.
    Madison Exclusive Student Humanitarian Scholarship
    Volunteering has been a rewarding part of my high school career. Early on I decided to seek out more volunteer opportunities to become a participant in giving back to my community. Overall, I have accumulated over three hundred hours of community service so far during high school. During my freshman year, I started the first high school American Red Cross Club in Kentucky. This gave me an opportunity to begin giving back to my community while encouraging other students to volunteer. I have served as President of the club all four years, and have organized many community service events such as a Thanksgiving food drive for families in need in the 8 surrounding counties of my area and a “Zombie Apocalypse” themed disaster preparedness program for fourth and fifth grade students in my school district. Through the American Red Cross, I also participated in the International Humanitarian Law Youth Action Campaign and learned about the importance of humanitarian law pertaining to education in war zones. During the pandemic, I organized a town-wide donation drive for the local hospital. I was able to collect over seven hundred items from my community, including items that would comfort families struggling with illness--such as children’s toys and clothes for those being discharged without any--and snacks as a thank you for medical workers. Serving as a Blood Donor Ambassador at the local American Red Cross Donation Center, I was able to help donors feel comfortable and appreciated throughout their experience. I have also enjoyed working with younger students while encouraging reading at book drives and teaching dance at clinics. I have also been working towards completing training as an Emergency Medical Technician and will have the chance to graduate high school this spring with my EMT certification. This past summer I sought out an opportunity to volunteer at my local EMS station. Volunteering has given me the opportunity to provide life-saving help to patients in need in real-life emergency situations throughout my community while also supporting those I worked alongside during a time of major shortage in healthcare professionals. Through volunteer work, I have been able to actively contribute to my local medical community while also learning and developing my medical career. I now feel an even deeper connection to a field I am extremely passionate about, and I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can gain more experience as I study to become a doctor, while also contributing to my community. Volunteering has made a positive impact on my life and has taught me leadership skills and hard work. I have gained experience that I otherwise would not have had, driving me to explore the things I am passionate about. These opportunities have allowed me to enjoy being able to make a difference in the lives of those around me. The connections I have made by meeting new people through these experiences have deepened my relationship with my community. I look forward to continuing to give back to my community by helping those in need while I’m in college and medical school as I pursue my passion of becoming a doctor and surgeon.
    Sloane Stephens Doc & Glo Scholarship
    Some say I am a perfectionist or an over-achiever. I call it tenacity. Merriam-Webster defines tenacity as “courage, mettle, spirit, resolution; mental or moral strength to resist opposition, danger, or hardship.” They even use the example “Sandburs are tenacious, and so are athletes who don’t let defeat get them down.” As an athlete, being involved in dance since the age of five, my determination in pursuing what I love has driven me to grow as a person. When I started dancing, I faced the paralyzing fear of failure when performing. However, as I overcame my perfectionism, I quickly came to enjoy performing and began competing after my first year. Dance has allowed me to become more confident in myself, teaching me to step out of my comfort zone and seek out new opportunities. I have learned to push myself to do more, which has led me to become a better leader and teammate. Challenging myself applies not only to dance but to other aspects of my life as well. I started setting bigger goals in order to do more than just what was required. I sought out more advanced classes, enabling me to follow my growing passion for becoming a doctor. Being tenacious and learning to be a hard worker has driven me to go above and beyond in everything I do. I work to improve physically outside of practice, finding joy in fitness, while in academics I strive to excel in learning. I have taken several independent studies, and “zero-hour” classes before the start of school each day, received over thirty hours of college dual credit, and serve as a peer tutor. As a senior, I have become a role model for younger students as previous seniors were once models for me. I sought out new ways to give back to my community and encourage others to get involved as well. I founded an American Red Cross Club at my high school, where I serve as President and have organized many volunteer events. Throughout my high school career, I have also been a part of an EMT training program and will have the opportunity to graduate this spring with my EMT certification. Since I have been looking forward to working as an EMT and giving back to those in need, I started volunteering with my local EMS service. This experience has shown that I am capable of handling emergency situations that will arise throughout my path, and I know I will be able to persevere in my pursuit of a medical career. While becoming an EMT is not my end career goal, I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can continue to gain experience and contribute to my community. Determination has allowed me to flourish while pursuing my passions. Beginning this fall I will be attending Western Kentucky University, where I am excited to continue my education, working toward becoming a doctor and surgeon as I study biology with a pre-med focus. I look forward to becoming a part of the community at WKU and have been accepted to WKU's Mahurin Honors College, where I will have the opportunity to conduct hands-on research and complete a thesis as an undergraduate before going on to medical school. Tenacity is one of the qualities I most appreciate in myself as I have developed into who I am today. While I wouldn’t say I’m a sandbur, as I try not to annoy, I would say I have the drive and determination to rise above challenges and continue to grow throughout my journey.
    Glen E Kaplan Memorial Scholarship
    When I was in second grade, we were asked to do a presentation on what we wanted to be when we grew up. I wanted to be a “doggie doctor.” After some time, I decided treating pets wasn’t the right choice for me; however, my interest in medicine was clearly present from a young age as I played doctor on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. Now I can confidently say I have a calling for medicine. I will be attending Western Kentucky University beginning this fall on a pre-med track, and plan to attend medical school to become a doctor and surgeon. I have also been accepted into WKU’s Honors College, which offers special opportunities such as an extensive study abroad program, and opportunities to conduct my own research projects and publish a thesis as an undergraduate. Because of my passion for medicine, I took the path of science and medical focus at my high school. I am fortunate to attend a school that participates in a program called Project Lead The Way, which presents hands-on development in biomedical science. This program has given me experience in completing processes used in the medical profession most students my age don’t have, such as performing DNA studies, researching real-world case studies, and independently performing numerous dissections. This experience has allowed me to learn early on that I truly enjoy the pursuit of a medical profession. During my freshman year, I began seeking out opportunities to give back to my community. Because of my interest in medicine, I learned of American Red Cross Clubs and started a club at my high school during my freshman year. I have served as club President throughout the last four years, organizing many community service events and encouraging other students to volunteer as well. Through all of my volunteer work—participating with clubs and as an individual volunteer—I have accumulated over 300 community service hours during high school thus far. My school also offers a hands-on program to complete training as an Emergency Medical Technician. I have worked to fit this additional program into my schedule by taking “zero hour” classes before the start of each school day and taking independent study classes in order to have enough time. Because of this, I will have the opportunity to graduate with my EMT certification this spring. Seeking out other community service opportunities related to the medical community, I began volunteering with the local Emergency Medical Services last summer. Initially, I expected to do paperwork, help clean and stock the trucks, and do other more mundane tasks around the station. However, once the EMTs I worked with learned of my experience from school, they quickly invited me to ride along on calls and assist them. Soon I was helping provide life-saving procedures. This hands-on experience in real-life situations has further confirmed my calling for medicine and my ability to handle emergency situations, so I know I will be able to persevere in my pursuit of a medical career. While becoming an EMT is not my end career goal, I plan to work as an EMT while in college and medical school so that I can gain more medical experience while also contributing to my community.
    Growing with Gabby Scholarship
    The sound of music filled my ears. No other sounds reached me: not the cheers of the crowd, not the pounding of my heart, not the heavy breaths of my team around me. Little thought went into the movements that carried me through the performance. It was muscle memory. My friends and I had been jumping with nerves just moments before, but now that all washed away. We moved across the stage as we had our entire lives. Then it was over like a snap of the fingers. Today I couldn’t imagine my life without dance. Although I was nervous when I started dancing at age five, I quickly came to enjoy performing and began competing after my first year. Dance has allowed me to become more confident in myself, teaching me to step out of my comfort zone and seek out new opportunities. Challenging myself to go above and beyond applies not only to dance but to other aspects of my life as well. I started setting bigger goals in order to do more than just what was required. I sought out more advanced classes, enabling me to follow my growing passion for becoming a doctor. Although this has been an ongoing process over the years, my annual dance recital at the end of my junior year seemed different—it boosted my confidence to a new high. The growth in my confidence aided in developing my leadership skills. As a senior, I have become a role model for younger students as previous seniors were once models for me. On my dance teams, this means keeping a positive attitude when things get hard, rallying the team together, and helping others improve while also working on myself. In school, this translates to helping other students find their way through their own challenges like I have. I also started an American Red Cross Club at my high school as an opportunity to encourage other students to volunteer and give back to our community. Personally, this drove me to more directly impact my community. Over the summer, I began volunteering at the local Emergency Medical Service station. I started out cleaning trucks and filing paperwork, but once the EMTs learned of my experience in a pre-medical program and EMT training at my high school, they quickly invited me to ride along and assist them. Soon I was helping provide life-saving procedures, which confirmed my calling for medicine and ability to handle emergency situations. This newfound increase in confidence also led me to be more independent this year. I have taken several independent study classes to allow time to be able to graduate from high school with my EMT certification. I also serve as a peer tutor and have taken several dual credit classes so that I will graduate with over thirty hours of college credit. The extra boost in confidence this year has allowed me to rise above challenges and try new experiences. I’m currently in the process of applying to model over the summer to earn money for college, which is something I would never have had the confidence to try before. The hard work I have put in over the past four years also led me to be accepted into the exclusive Honors College at the university I will be attending beginning this fall. As an honors student, I will have special opportunities to study abroad, conduct research projects, and write a thesis as an undergraduate. All of these are opportunities I would never have had if I had not felt the increased confidence that began with my junior year dance recital.
    Chief Lawrence J. Nemec Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    When I am asked, “What made you want to become a doctor?” I can’t help but laugh a little. At first, I had no idea. I have a vivid memory of walking out of the doors of my middle school on the last day of eighth grade, getting in the car with my mom, and suddenly announcing, “I think I want to be a doctor.” I’m not sure what possessed me to decide this, but later I began remembering when I did my career day presentation in second grade. I wanted to be a “doggie doctor.” Eventually I decided treating pets wasn’t the right choice for me; however, my interest in medicine was clearly present from a young age as I played doctor on my stuffed animals, putting bandage wraps on their little legs and listening to them with my toy stethoscope. Now I can confidently say I have a calling for medicine. Because of this interest, I took the path of science and medical focus at my school. I am fortunate to attend a school that participates in a program called Project Lead The Way, which presents hands-on development in biomedical science. My school also offers the opportunity to complete training as an Emergency Medical Technician and I will have the chance to graduate with my EMT certification this spring. Last summer I sought out an opportunity to volunteer with the local EMS. Initially, I expected to do paperwork, help clean and stock the trucks, and other more mundane tasks around the station. However, once the EMTs I worked with learned of my experience from school, they quickly invited me to ride along on calls. They started giving me pointers and showing me things I would be doing as an EMT that a textbook or classroom couldn’t. Volunteering also meant becoming a part of the crew--an experience that I would never trade. I was able to bond more closely with the medical community and witness the close-knit connection among medical workers. Being in the field and delivering life-saving medical interventions has brought me face-to-face with real-life emergency situations, and the experience has further solidified my calling for medicine. I have been able to provide help to patients in need throughout my community while also supporting those I worked alongside during a time of major shortage in healthcare professionals. Being a volunteer means that I have been able to actively contribute to my local medical community while also learning and developing my medical career. I now feel an even deeper connection to a field I am extremely passionate about. Volunteering for my local EMT service has not only helped me grow my experience in providing medical aid but has also confirmed my calling for medicine and my ability to handle emergency situations. I look forward to working as an EMT while in college and medical school, saving people in need and continuing to contribute to my community.