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Alexander Kang

1585

Bold Points

3x

Finalist

2x

Winner

Bio

Hello! I am an incoming student at the University of Pennsylvania hoping to study the intersection between biology and business. I am 1 of 24 students selected in the Class of 2028 to study in the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences & Management (LSM), a coordinated dual degree program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at Penn. I am the founder of patchheartworks.org, a service organization that seeks to comfort others through art therapy. I am also a student researcher at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, investigating how mutations and unique macromolecular interactions influence protein structure and activity. I am a Governor’s STEM Scholar and president of my high school’s Biology Club and Biological Research Apparatus Club while also being involved in organizations like DECA, Student Government, and Korean Culture Club. I am an active woodwind player in my community, serving as the principal clarinetist for the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra and qualifying for numerous regional, state, and national honor ensembles. I perform the baritone saxophone and clarinet (4-time Best Soloist Medalist) in my high school’s jazz band and symphony orchestra. While my main interests lie in biology and the life sciences, I am also interested in business administration and management. In the future, I aspire to establish my own pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability by advocating for universal access to life-changing therapies.

Education

University of Pennsylvania

Bachelor's degree program
2024 - 2028
  • Majors:
    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
    • Entrepreneurial and Small Business Operations
    • Business/Managerial Economics
    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other

Cherry Hill High School East

High School
2020 - 2024
  • GPA:
    4

Miscellaneous

  • Desired degree level:

    Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)

  • Graduate schools of interest:

    -
  • Transfer schools of interest:

    -
  • Majors of interest:

    • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other
    • Medicine
    • Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences
    • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, Other
    • Music
    • Education, General
    • Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering
    • Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, Other
    • Education, Other
    -
  • Planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Education

    • Dream career goals:

      Chief Executive Officer

    • President (11-12)

      Cherry Hill High School East (CHE) Biological Research Apparatus Club & Biology Club
      2020 – Present4 years
    • 3-time President's Volunteer Service Gold Award

      The President of the United States
      2020 – Present4 years
    • $2,000 First Place Richard C. Goodwin-Josiah DuBois Humanitarian Award

      Esther Raab Holocaust Museum and Goodwin Education Center
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Team Captain; Community Outreach Committee (11-12)

      CHE DECA
      2021 – Present3 years
    • Junior Vice President; 3-Time Class Representative

      CHE Student Government Association (SGA)
      2020 – Present4 years
    • Elizabeth A. Allen & Isabelle M. Hickman 4-year College Scholarship Recipient ($1,500 scholarship for one year (renewable for one consecutive year in college, $3,000 total))

      New Jersey Retirees’ Education Association (NJREA)
      2024 – Present5 months
    • GE-Reagan Foundation Scholarship Program Semifinalist (1 of 120 selected nationwide from over 16,000 applicants (0.75% acceptance rate))

      GE-Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute
      2024 – Present5 months
    • National DECA Harry A. Applegate Scholarship Recipient ($1,000 scholarship; only recipient from New Jersey)

      DECA Inc.
      2024 – Present5 months
    • $500 Korean Honor Scholarship Recipient; 1 of 4 in USA

      The Ambassador of the Republic of Korea
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Top 6 International Finalist in "Entrepreneurship Series”; 96th percentile (exam + roleplays)

      Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA)
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Coca-Cola Scholars Semifinalist; 1/1,514 selected from 103,800+ applicants (1.45 % acceptance rate)

      Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation
      2023 – Present1 year
    • Governor’s STEM Scholar

      Governor’s STEM Scholars
      2023 – Present1 year

    Sports

    Cross-Country Running

    Junior Varsity
    2021 - 20221 year

    Awards

    • Motivated struggling runners like myself during daily practices & warm-ups; used bilingualism to help new student build comradeship w/ team

    Research

    • Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

      University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine; Gupta-Van Duyne Lab at Stellar-Chance LaboratoriesStudent Lab Researcher
      2023 – Present

    Arts

    • Philadelphia Youth Orchestra (PYO)

      Music
      2022 – Present
    • 7-time Best Soloist Medalist; Cavalcade of Bands Jazz Festivals

      Music
      2022 – 2023
    • All South Jersey Honor Ensemble Concertmaster - First Chair Principal Bb Clarinetist; South Jersey Band and Orchestra Directors Association (SJBODA)

      Music
      2019 – 2023
    • Bronze Rating Recipient for successful performance on Bb clarinet at the NJ State Solo and Ensemble Winter Festival; Arts Ed NJ

      Music
      2021 – 2021
    • New Jersey All State Honor Ensemble Clarinetist; New Jersey Music Educators Association (NJMEA)

      Music
      2022 – 2022
    • NAfME All Eastern Honor Ensemble Clarinetist

      Music
      2023 – 2023

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Korean School of Southern New Jersey (KSSNJ) & CHE Korean Culture ClubTraditional Drum (Modeum-Buk) Leader & Soloist
      2018 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Patch heART Works - patchheartworks.orgFounder & President
      2022 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Program; The Family Counseling Center of Greater Washington (FCCGW)Helper, Tutor, & Mentor
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Edelweiss Ensemble - Student-run music community service organizationBb Clarinet/Alto Saxophone Instrumental Performer
      2021 – Present
    • Volunteering

      Korean School of Southern New Jersey (KSSNJ)Forum Discussion member
      2021 – 2022
    • Volunteering

      Korean School of Southern New Jersey (KSSNJ)Teacher Assistant
      2020 – 2022

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    WCEJ Thornton Foundation Music & Art Scholarship
    During my time as a clarinetist in the All Eastern Honor Ensemble, I had the privilege of listening to Dr. Peter Boonshaft, an esteemed music educator, conductor, and author who talked to the ensemble as a guest speaker. He delved into a captivating speech discussing 8 personal anecdotes tied to a random object, such as “old man” or “barge”. While they seemed nonsensical at first, each word was connected to a lesson that inspired us to embrace the power of music and the impact it can have on our lives. One story he recalled involved his experience conducting a high school festival in “the single statistically documented poorest place in America”, where the students used makeshift instruments made of wires, rubber bands, and duct tape. Overwhelmed with guilt, he realized his privilege in not having to endure hardships like using an outhouse or having dirt floors as a third of the residents did. Before the concert, he read a wooden sign on the wall that said "Today, this day, I will give everything I have, for anything I keep, I will have lost forever." These words brought him to tears, realizing that true wealth lay in the students' unwavering work ethic and commitment to giving their best in every moment. This experience transformed Dr. Boonshaft's life, compelling him to give his all in everything he did, music or otherwise. As Dr. Boonshaft moved on to the next object, I felt a sudden lump in my throat. The words on the wooden sign left a lasting impression on me, reshaping my approach not only to practicing music but to life itself. Dr. Boonshaft's monologue revealed his expertise, accomplishments, and dedication to educating not just exceptional musicians, but motivated and brilliant human beings. It was through experiences like this that music had such a profound impact on my life. Inspired by Dr. Boonshaft's words, I decided to share my musical talents with the community through several mediums, such as participating in monthly performances or senior citizens at nursing homes through the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization based in Cherry Hill. I was also the Outreach Director for a school club called East Musicians on Call (EMC), where I participated in numerous community benefit concerts and events in support of Project Crescendo, a fundraiser that supports the funding for instruments and rentals for local elementary/middle school music programs.
    Mental Health Empowerment Scholarship
    During the pandemic, my mental health declined drastically because I was concerned for the members of my community who had been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a coping strategy, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    College Kick-Start Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship and attending college will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Our Destiny Our Future Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Deborah Thomas Scholarship Award
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Brotherhood Bows Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Kashi’s Journey Scholarship
    During the pandemic, my mental health declined drastically because I was concerned for the members of my community who had been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a coping strategy, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Morgan Stem Diversity in STEM Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Michael Mattera Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Jonas Griffith Scholarship
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Dan Leahy Scholarship Fund
    One of my earliest and most vivid memories of sophomore year was seeing a tall man with sleek gray hair and abnormally large ears coming to my rescue as I anxiously searched for the chemistry classroom. Little did I know that entering room C-314 that day (or as he called it, “The pi room!”) would mark the beginning of my transformative experience with my chemistry teacher Mr. Rouen. Throughout the school year, I soon discovered that Mr. Rouen's passion for chemistry was infectious. His engaging teaching style, coupled with his ability to break down complex concepts into digestible pieces, made every class session captivating and inspiring. Beyond the subject itself, Mr. Rouen’s enthusiasm and knack for incorporating humor into his lectures had the entire class laughing, and I found myself anticipating each chemistry lesson, eager to discover the wonders of the subject under his guidance. Not only was I fortunate enough to be Mr. Rouen's student for two years (both Chemistry Honors and AP Chem!), but our relationship extended beyond the classroom to my musical pursuits. His genuine interest in my musical endeavors created a unique bond (stronger than any molecular bond!) that went beyond the traditional student-teacher relationship. Whether I performed in the jazz band, the spring musical's pit orchestra, or community benefit concerts, I could always count on seeing Mr. Rouen's encouraging smile in the audience lighting up the room. His unwavering support meant the world to me. He went above and beyond, often proudly displaying printed pictures of me next to the chemistry board and occasionally sharing videos of my performances at the end of class for all to see. The humility and gratitude I felt were overwhelming, and his genuine joy in showcasing my progress touched my heart and motivated me to strive for even greater achievements. I am beyond thankful to have a mentor like Mr. Rouen, as our bond has nurtured my sense of ambition, intellectual curiosity, and passion to do what I love. I love doing speech and debate because it allows me to share my own unique voice with the world. Whether it's talking about fear in an informative speech or reciting a declaration of President Coolidge's speech as a Coolidge Cup National Qualifier, speech and debate has been incredibly rewarding in terms of finding topics that I am interested about and sharing them in an academic setting. I am grateful to my speech coaches for their unwavering support throughout my journey.
    Shays Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which motivated me to pursue drug development research at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Morgan Levine Dolan Community Service Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Jorian Kuran Harris (Shugg) Helping Heart Foundation Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community that may have been hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, there were also those who didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and volunteered at a community event for cancer patients in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields on the surface, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals and new drug development. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will aid in my education and allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    RonranGlee Literary Scholarship
    "Tell me, Muse, of the man of many ways, who was driven far journeys, after he had sacked Troy's sacred citadel. Many were they whose cities he saw, whose minds he learned of, many the pains he suffered in his spirit on the wide sea, struggling for his own life and the homecoming of his companions. Even so he could not save his companions, hard though he strove to; they were destroyed by their own wild recklessness, fools, who devoured the oxen of Helios, the Sun God, and he took away the day of their homecoming" (The Odyssey by Homer, Lines 1-9). The first lines of Homer's "The Odyssey" establish Odysseus as a complex figure setting off on a journey of moral turmoil and self-discovery as he explores topics of divine intervention, cross-cultural interaction, and the fallout from human hubris in his adventures. To begin, the Muse refers to Odysseus as "the man of many ways", which characterizes his crafty intellect, resilience, and adaptability. The line "who was driven far journeys" emphasizes Odysseus's life's theme of restlessness and his unwavering quest for adventure. Odysseus meets and learns about a variety of civilizations during his journeys, highlighting the idea of cultural interchange and the interdependence of the ancient Mediterranean region. The expression "struggling for his own life and the homecoming of his companions" highlights both Odysseus's desire to live and to get back to Ithaca. Here, the narrative highlights Odysseus' sense of obligation and commitment to his allies as he works to guarantee their safe return. The tragic fate of his friends, however, serves as a warning about the results of hubris and irresponsibility despite his best attempts. The phrase "Even so he could not save his companions" emphasizes how limited Odysseus's agency and power were in the face of both divine intervention and human foolishness. A crucial point in the story is when the companions' demise—caused by their ingestion of the holy cattle of Helios, the Sun God—is mentioned. This event represents the breaking of cosmic order and the violation of divine rule. The line "he took away the day of their homecoming," which represents Helios' punishment, highlights the concept of divine justice and the unchangeable will of the gods. It also represents the divine vengeance for their sacrilege and arrogance. Essentially, Homer's opening lines hint at the epic trip of Odysseus while also addressing more general themes of human fortitude, cultural connection, hubris's consequences, and the part that divine intervention plays in determining one's fate. Homer encourages readers to join him on a timeless journey of self-discovery, moral development, and the never-ending search for homecoming through vivid imagery and expressive language. Moreover, the opening invocation to the Muse in "The Odyssey" functions as both a thematic anchor for the story and a literary device signifying the start of the epic tale. Homer creates a framework in which heavenly inspiration and direction are essential in influencing the course of the story by calling upon the Muse. This invocation is consistent with the larger cultural and theological background of ancient Greece, a civilization that was firmly rooted in the concept that the gods would intervene. Homer recognizes the heavenly influence that penetrates every part of Odysseus' journey—from the difficulties he encounters to the satisfying conclusion of his quest for homecoming—through the invocation. Furthermore, the expression "who was driven far journeys" describes both the actual lengths that Odysseus travels as well as his metaphorical journey of self-discovery and personal development. In addition to being a sequence of geographical travels, Odysseus' odyssey is a life-changing event that puts his morals to the test, disproves his convictions, and ultimately shapes his identity as a hero. Every interaction and challenge that Odysseus faces during the journey acts as a crucible that forces him to face his shortcomings, fears, and moral quandaries. Additionally, the story of Odysseus' comrades and their terrible end serves as a warning about the results of human hubris and disobedience to divine will. Greek mythology frequently features the idea of divine retribution for deadly sins, emphasizing the value of religiosity, modesty, and respect for the gods. The demise of Odysseus's friends in this situation serves as a sobering warning of the dangers of disobedience and the certainty of divine vengeance. In conclusion, the opening lines of "The Odyssey" by Homer laid the foundation for an enduring epic journey that teach valuable lessons about bravery, morality, and resilience. Through spectacular imagery, deep insights into the human condition, and a wealth of symbolism, Homer uses the pursuit of homecoming as a metaphor for the universal longing for salvation, acceptance, and meaning in life.
    Kalia D. Davis Memorial Scholarship
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) during the pandemic to uplift spirits through art therapy. We collaborate with many local organizations to host monthly craft workshops, such as Mother’s Day flower bouquets for children and teens at public libraries or paper watermelon fans for patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's at rehab centers. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but I hope to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe this scholarship will allow me to continue my education in college, medical school, and beyond in order to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Dr. Robert M. Fleisher Liberty and Prosperity Award
    Winner
    From childhood nursery rhymes to high school history classes, American democracy has always been an integral part of our lives. The Pledge of Allegiance became second nature along with chanting “Mary Had a Little Lamb” as part of the daily morning routine. James Madison’s Bill of Rights was analyzed more than Hamlet. And of course, Schoolhouse Rock!’s Preamble song was more catchy than any Taylor Swift sensation. In the midst of these encounters with our nation’s governing system throughout our lives, our democracy has faced both challenges and transformations in recent years, such as the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing Israel-Gaza conflict. These horrifying global events make it all the more imperative to reflect on what makes democracy and voting so vital. Merriam-Webster defines democracy simply as “government by the people”, but to those who fought for it, those last three words represent the very essence of our nation’s identity and future. By the people. The words “liberty and justice for all” from the Pledge of Allegiance perfectly embody a fundamental principle of our democracy: individual freedom. While the Constitution directly incorporates inalienable rights into its pages, this liberty goes far beyond the privilege to vote in an election; we also carry the responsibility to engage in protecting the rights of all citizens. This ideology has become especially important in light of social and political movements addressing discrimination, inequality, and prejudice in our marginalized communities. From the civil rights movement to current debates about gender and LGBTQ rights, the right to take a stand as an individual is an empowering aspect of our democracy. In addition to ensuring every citizen has a stake in shaping the nation’s future through independent rights, democracy also prioritizes decision making as a group. The very Supreme Law of our Land, the Constitution, is not the masterpiece of a single person, but rather a shared vision for a just and harmonious society against the authoritarian British monarchy. Collaboration in the US democratic system fosters a culture of open dialogue and debate unlike any other governing body in the world. Ordinary citizens are encouraged to take on the political stage and actually express opinions of all backgrounds and advocate for changes that are meaningful to us and our communities, no matter the race, gender, age, or socioeconomic status. Another cornerstone of our democracy is our emphasis on accountability. Elected officials are held responsible for their decisions and impact on enacting the needs and aspirations of the people. The checks and balances system in essence safeguards our democracy against becoming stagnant or autocratic and are essential components of the democratic framework. The level of transparency in the independent judiciary and branches of government protect the rights of all citizens. Democracy isn’t a static concept: it is a living and breathing entity dependent on the active engagement from its citizens. In a time when division and violence threaten to pull us apart, it is our democracy that binds us together, providing a common goal to achieve. Democracy is more than just a dictionary definition. It’s the heartbeat of our nation, the collective symphony of voices shaping its politics, its economy, and its destiny. It’s the compass guiding us through the labyrinth of liberty, reminding us of the living, breathing commitment to the ideals that unite our strength and diversity, making it a unique and invaluable system of governance. We owe it to ourselves, our fellow citizens, and future generations to protect and nurture the democracy that defines us and to ensure that its light continues to shine brightly in an often tumultuous world.
    Janean D. Watkins Overcoming Adversity Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community who were hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, some didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) during the pandemic to uplift spirits through art therapy. We collaborate with many local organizations to host monthly craft workshops, such as Mother’s Day flower bouquets for children and teens at public libraries or paper watermelon fans for patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's at rehab centers. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but I hope to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe Patch heART Works and LSM will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Janean D. Watkins Aspiring Healthcare Professionals Scholarship
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) during the pandemic to uplift spirits through art therapy. We collaborate with many local organizations to host monthly craft workshops, such as Mother’s Day flower bouquets for children and teens at public libraries or paper watermelon fans for patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's at rehab centers. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but I hope to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe Patch heART Works and LSM will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Bald Eagle Scholarship
    One of my earliest and most vivid memories of sophomore year was seeing a tall man with sleek gray hair and abnormally large ears coming to my rescue as I anxiously searched for the chemistry classroom. Little did I know that entering room C-314 that day (or as he called it, “The pi room!”) would mark the beginning of my transformative experience with my chemistry teacher Mr. Rouen. Throughout the school year, I soon discovered that Mr. Rouen's passion for chemistry was infectious. His engaging teaching style, coupled with his ability to break down complex concepts into digestible pieces, made every class session captivating and inspiring. Beyond the subject itself, Mr. Rouen’s enthusiasm and knack for incorporating humor into his lectures had the entire class laughing, and I found myself anticipating each chemistry lesson, eager to discover the wonders of the subject under his guidance. Not only was I fortunate enough to be Mr. Rouen's student for two years (both Chemistry Honors and AP Chem!), but our relationship extended beyond the classroom to my musical pursuits. His genuine interest in my musical endeavors created a unique bond (stronger than any molecular bond!) that went beyond the traditional student-teacher relationship. Whether I performed in the jazz band, the spring musical's pit orchestra, or community benefit concerts, I could always count on seeing Mr. Rouen's encouraging smile in the audience lighting up the room. His unwavering support meant the world to me. He went above and beyond, often proudly displaying printed pictures of me next to the chemistry board and occasionally sharing videos of my performances at the end of class for all to see. The humility and gratitude I felt were overwhelming, and his genuine joy in showcasing my progress touched my heart and motivated me to strive for even greater achievements. At the end of my junior year, I personally asked Mr. Rouen if he would be willing to write me a letter of recommendation for my college applications, and he responded by sending me a questionnaire to fill out so that he can write the best possible letter. The last question asked "If you could only take three items with you to college what would they be?", and I responded with my clarinet, notes from AP biology/chemistry, and snowboard. Music has become an integral part of my identity, and I would like to continue to foster my love for music in college (even though I will not be pursuing a career in it), whether that be through an orchestra/band or just for fun. My AP notes will serve as a good resource to have on hand should I need them when taking STEM-related courses in college and I forget what vapor pressure is. Finally, snowboarding is a hobby I really enjoy and definitely want to do more of, so I would bring my snowboard to college should there come a time where I plan a ski/snowboarding trip with friends. Using this information, Mr. Rouen became an integral part of my application that ultimately led to me getting accepted to the University of Pennsylvania, specifically for studying in the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences & Management (LSM) between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School. I am beyond thankful to have a mentor like Mr. Rouen, as our bond exemplifies the life changing impact an educator can have on a young mind.
    Online Learning Innovator Scholarship
    Quizlet is an accessible and efficient resource among the many available online learning tools. As an academically driven student, there have been many instances where I find myself on the website searching through thousands of study sets made by fellow like-minded students to help me understand difficult ideas and become proficient in a variety of subjects. The adaptive platform makes thousands of user-generated study resources, including well constructed study guides and flashcards, available for free. This vast amount of knowledge covers almost every topic conceivable and meets the various demands of students all over the world. Quizlet consistently delivers useful tools to enhance my academic pursuits, be it exploring Shakespearean sonnets or comprehending the complexities of probability theory. Quizlet also has a collection of essential memorization tools that have completely changed the way I approach learning. In particular, the platform's flashcard feature has been quite helpful in helping to reinforce important language and concepts. I can methodically go over and absorb important material because of Quizlet's ability to break down complex knowledge into manageable parts. Furthermore, I can adjust study sessions to fit my own learning preferences by adding mnemonic devices or categorizing knowledge into themes thanks to the customizable flashcard feature. Quizlet's matching game, which turns rote memory into an interesting and involved experience, is another fantastic feature. In addition to improving recall, this gamified approach to learning also makes studying more pleasurable and fulfilling. I actively reinforce my comprehension of the subject matter while simultaneously refining my cognitive talents by setting myself the challenge of matching terms with their accompanying definitions or examples. Quizlet is a valuable tool not only for standard academic pursuits but also for specific fields like DECA competitions. As a participant in the "Entrepreneurship Series” competitive event, I used Quizlet's powerful platform to study performance indicators and review practice tests. I was able to delve deeply into the complexities of entrepreneurial principles due to the easily accessible study materials on Quizlet, which ultimately led to my accomplishment as a top 6 international finalist. This accomplishment is evidence of the revolutionary power of Quizlet in promoting not just academic success but also practical application of knowledge. In conclusion, Quizlet is a digital educational powerhouse that provides an abundance of tools and resources to help students pursue their knowledge. With its extensive library of study materials and cutting-edge memorizing tools, Quizlet has completely changed the way people learn and enabled them to achieve academic success in a wide range of topics. My own Quizlet experience has been filled with innumerable moments of scholastic success, from passing exams with flying colors to winning prizes in competitions. I am convinced that Quizlet's unwavering dedication to quality will continue to push me into greater heights of achievement as I continue to leverage its strength in my academic endeavors as 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
    William A. Stuart Dream Scholarship
    I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) during the pandemic to uplift spirits through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area to host craft workshops and hang up seasonal wall decorations, from beautiful spring flowers and refreshing summer ocean waves to breathtaking fall leaves and jolly winter snowmen! We also received media attention from our township newspaper, making a front page feature for my work. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to reach out to a new drug research lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my own project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. I investigated how mutations affect the protein's structure and also how unique macromolecular interactions can influence its activity levels. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the "Entrepreneurship Series" event, which involved not only identifying venture opportunities and market needs, but also making informed decisions and taking the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. William A. Stuart's story deeply resonates with me, especially since I will also be attending the University of Pennsylvania. While I may not be currently pursuing engineering or computer science, I realize its growing importance in today's society, especially with the exploding growth of AI. I hope to use this scholarship to carry on William A. Stuart's legacy of fostering learning and innovation and to achieve my goal of rallying for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow while also incorporating aspects of artificial intelligence and engineering to make that my vision a reality.
    Jiang Amel STEM Scholarship
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) during the pandemic to uplift spirits through art therapy. We collaborate with many local organizations to host monthly craft workshops, such as Mother’s Day flower bouquets for children and teens at public libraries or paper watermelon fans for patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's at rehab centers. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them, which introduced me to the business aspect of drug implementation. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug's lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction. I also learned that while clinical Principal Investigators require medical expertise to interpret results and design protocols for Investigational New Drug and New Drug Applications, effective management skills are equally if not more critical to orchestrate successful trials. While bioscience and business may seem like unrelated fields, individuals capable of harnessing both aspects are becoming more and more essential in the landscape of pharmaceuticals. As 1 of 24 students accepted to the Vagelos Program in Life Sciences and Management (LSM) between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's, but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but I hope to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe Patch heART Works and LSM will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow
    Angelia Zeigler Gibbs Book Scholarship
    I would call this new chapter of my life "Perusing People, Places, and Prayers". As 1 of 24 students selected for the Vagelos Life Sciences & Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to explore the intersection between biology and business to eventually become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of developing life-changing therapies while also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. But before I can do any of that, I look forward to taking advantage of the vast resources and opportunities available to me at The University of Pennsylvania. Penn not only offers the strongest pre-med programs in the country but also opens the doors to endless opportunities to conduct groundbreaking research, collaborate with renowned medical professionals, and network with like-minded peers who share my passion for medicine. The campus is especially close to home, and I have had numerous experiences of experiencing its campus, people, and limitless opportunities firsthand. I am eternally grateful for the doors Penn has opened for me, and I will do everything I can do peruse the people, places, and prayers with the goal of rallying for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Keri Sohlman Memorial Scholarship
    Technology has had a significant impact on how we are exposed to information on a daily basis, with this constant connectivity resulting in the alarming spread of misinformed individuals, baseless claims, and unsubstantiated arguments. As a result, I believe it is my obligation as a future science professional to take the initiative to promote good information spreading practices to bridge the gap between the scientific community and the public cyberspace, whether that is establishing a media presence of my own or collaborating with fellow scientists to call out misinformation. Everyone deserves to have access to reliable, accurate, and safe scientific information in the modern world, and using social media platforms, online forums, chat groups, and more will enable us to get closer to achieving that goal. I was inspired to pursue STEM from my father’s work in gene therapy, but I became fascinated with the intricacies of drug development by working at a lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. I also founded patchheartworks.org to uplift community members through art therapy, and my close relationships with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s seniors ignited my curiosity about how drugs are brought to market, leading me to discover clinical trials. As 1 of 24 students selected for the Vagelos Life Sciences & Management (LSM) Coordinated Dual Degree Program between the College of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, I aspire to explore the intersection between biology and business to eventually become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of developing life-changing therapies while also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I am passionate about educating the brightest minds of the next generation about good pharmaceutical practices that combine science with accessibility. As a Chief Executive Officer, I believe that we have a responsibility as scientists to disseminate research to all audiences beyond the scientific community. By doing this, we can increase public knowledge and science literacy in an accessible way. I see myself doing this by communicate my ideas and findings at seminars, conferences, blog posts, and more.
    Nick Lindblad Memorial Scholarship
    The first thing that intrigued me about the clarinet in fourth grade was its shiny silver keys and buttons that all clicked and clacked to make the most wonderful sound. And of course, the fact that Squidward played it made the sleek woodwind instrument no less appealing. Throughout my musical journey since then, I had no shortage of incredible opportunities to explore the delicate intricacies of musical works, as well as the memories I made with the network of people I met along the way. Throughout middle school and high school, I worked extensively through hours of practicing and rehearsals to make regional, state, and national-level honor ensembles. Through an audition, I was placed as the concertmaster of the All South Jersey Honor Ensemble and was also selected as a Bb clarinetist for the All Eastern Honor Ensemble as the only student from my high school. Through this incredible residential experience in Rochester, NY, I was able to connect and make phenomenal music with the best musicians on the East Coast, as well as perform at the renowned Eastman Theatre. One such experience that still resonates with me from All Eastern and has shaped the way I view not only music but life as a whole was listening to Dr. Peter Boonshaft, an esteemed music educator, conductor, and author who talked to the ensemble as a guest speaker. He delved into a captivating speech discussing 8 personal anecdotes tied to a random object, such as “old man” or “barge”. While they seemed nonsensical at first, each word was connected to a lesson that inspired us to embrace the power of music and the impact it can have on our lives. One story he recalled involved his experience conducting a high school festival in “the single statistically documented poorest place in America”, where the students used makeshift instruments made of wires, rubber bands, and duct tape. Overwhelmed with guilt, he realized his privilege in not having to endure hardships like using an outhouse or having dirt floors as a third of the residents did. Before the concert, he read a wooden sign on the wall that said "Today, this day, I will give everything I have, for anything I keep, I will have lost forever." These words brought him to tears, realizing that true wealth lay in the students' unwavering work ethic and commitment to giving their best in every moment. This experience transformed Dr. Boonshaft's life, compelling him to give his all in everything he did, music or otherwise. As Dr. Boonshaft moved on to the next object, I felt a sudden lump in my throat. The words on the wooden sign left a lasting impression on me, reshaping my approach not only to practicing music but to life itself. Dr. Boonshaft's monologue revealed his expertise, accomplishments, and dedication to educating not just exceptional musicians, but motivated and brilliant human beings. It was through experiences like this that music had such a profound impact on my life. Inspired by Dr. Boonshaft's words, I decided to share my musical talents with the community through several mediums, such as participating in monthly performances or senior citizens at nursing homes through the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization based in Cherry Hill. I was also the Outreach Director for a school club called East Musicians on Call (EMC), where I participated in numerous community benefit concerts and events in support of Project Crescendo, a fundraiser that supports the funding for instruments and rentals for local elementary/middle school music programs.
    'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' Insight Scholarship
    The phrase "Once upon a time in Hollywood" transports me to an era that is both distant and intimately familiar, conjuring images of dazzling premieres, iconic movie stars, and the enchanting allure of a bygone era. Hollywood, as both a physical place and a symbol of dreams, has played a pivotal role in shaping societal narratives, particularly in the realm of love and relationships. Yet, this dream factory does more than just create illusions; it serves as a profound source of nostalgia and comfort in a world often marred by harsh realities. Hollywood's portrayal of love and relationships has been a double-edged sword. On one hand, it has the power to idealize the nuances of love through classics like "Casablanca" or "Gone with the Wind". By recalling a story where love conquers all and the protagonists live happily after all, Hollywood sometimes fosters unrealistic expectations, setting the stage for disappointment in real-world relationships. On the other hand, films like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" or "Blue Valentine" delve into the intricacies of love, exploring its fragility and imperfections. These heart-wrenching stories allow viewers to find comfort in the more realistic portrayal of relationships and the challenges and imperfections that accompany it. Additionally, Hollywood has become a sanctuary of nostalgia and comfort in a world where devastating global events occur week by week. Cinema provides a refuge—a place where we can escape the harshness of reality and immerse ourselves in the magic of storytelling. The phrase "Once upon a time in Hollywood" is a beacon of familiarity and warmth. The golden age of Hollywood, with its glamour and sophistication, represents a simpler time, an era untouched by the complexities of the modern world. Films like "Singin' in the Rain" or "It Happened One Night" transport us to a realm where problems are neatly resolved, and love conquers all. In this cinematic utopia, we find solace in the messiness of reality, if only for a fleeting moment. However, the comfort derived from Hollywood's nostalgic embrace is not a mere escape; it is a testament to the enduring power of storytelling. The narratives woven by Hollywood transcend time and space, resonating with audiences across generations. In the face of adversity, these stories become a source of strength, reminding us of our shared humanity and the timeless themes that bind us together. In conclusion, the phrase "Once upon a time in Hollywood" encapsulates a complex combination of emotions, from the idealized notions of love to the comforting embrace of nostalgia. Hollywood, with its ability to shape societal narratives and provide solace in tumultuous times, occupies a unique space in our collective consciousness. As we navigate the challenges of the present, the dream factory of Hollywood continues to weave tales that inspire, console, and transport us to a place where, even if just for a moment, love reigns supreme and the world is a little more magical.
    West Family Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community who were hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, some didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to foster joy, peace and healing through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. I believe that everyone deserves to have a network they can lean on for comfort, and I wanted Patch heART Works to provide a creative outlet for those who struggled with finding that support while also raising awareness about the importance of helping out people in need in our communities. We have numerous clients throughout the area and were recently approached by the local Penn Medicine facility to volunteer at an Oncology Holiday Event in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them once they are developed, which introduced me to the managerial aspect of drug implementation in the business world. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug’s lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction, and that effective management skills are equally as important as a sophisticated understanding of medicine to successfully conduct clinical trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the “Entrepreneurship Series'' event, which involved identifying venture opportunities to take the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. Today, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe exploring the intersection between medicine and business will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Jeanie A. Memorial Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community who were hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, some didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to foster joy, peace and healing through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. I believe that everyone deserves to have a network they can lean on for comfort, and I wanted Patch heART Works to provide a creative outlet for those who struggled with finding that support while also raising awareness about the importance of helping out people in need in our communities. We have numerous clients throughout the area and were recently approached by the local Penn Medicine facility to volunteer at an Oncology Holiday Event in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them once they are developed, which introduced me to the managerial aspect of drug implementation in the business world. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug’s lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction, and that effective management skills are equally as important as a sophisticated understanding of medicine to successfully conduct clinical trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the “Entrepreneurship Series'' event, which involved identifying venture opportunities to take the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. Today, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe exploring the intersection between medicine and business will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Bulchand and Laxmi Motwani Memorial Scholarship
    During the pandemic, I grew increasingly concerned for the members of my community who were hit especially hard and struggled to stay positive or get the support they needed during the challenging time. Fortunately for many of us, we were able to endure and overcome the hardships of limited contact through encouraging Instagram posts and hilarious FaceTime calls. And most importantly of all, we had each other to rely on to stay motivated and optimistic for the future. However, some didn’t have that support system, especially senior citizens and residents in nursing homes and rehab centers. As a result, I founded Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org) to foster joy, peace and healing through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. I believe that everyone deserves to have a network they can lean on for comfort, and I wanted Patch heART Works to provide a creative outlet for those who struggled with finding that support while also raising awareness about the importance of helping out people in need in our communities. We have numerous clients throughout the area and were recently approached by the local Penn Medicine facility to volunteer at an Oncology Holiday Event in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them once they are developed, which introduced me to the managerial aspect of drug implementation in the business world. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug’s lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction, and that effective management skills are equally as important as a sophisticated understanding of medicine to successfully conduct clinical trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the “Entrepreneurship Series'' event, which involved identifying venture opportunities to take the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. Today, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe exploring the intersection between medicine and business will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    Frank and Nelcie Williams Memorial Scholarship
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. I founded Patch heART Works (pathheartworks.org) during the pandemic to share positive feelings of beauty and comfort through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and were recently approached by the local Penn Medicine facility to volunteer at an Oncology Holiday Event in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them once they are developed, which introduced me to the managerial aspect of drug implementation in the business world. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug’s lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction, and that effective management skills are equally as important as a sophisticated understanding of medicine to successfully conduct clinical trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the “Entrepreneurship Series'' event, which involved identifying venture opportunities to take the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. Today, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe exploring the intersection between medicine and business will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    STEM & Medicine Passion Essay
    As I held a cadaver heart during my first lab at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine, I was struck by its weight; it felt hefty for its small size, yet soft to the touch. The tissue was pale gray, a shell of its once bright crimson hue, but the intricate network of veins and arteries remained tightly woven around it. I could almost imagine the heart pulsing ever so slightly, and I was able to feel my heartbeat echoing in my ear like a beating drum. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with cardiology and medicine ignited from holding that lifeless organ. The humbling experience reminded me that someone had donated their body to continue this scientific innovation, which evoked a sense of deep respect and an urge to continue helping my community. I founded Patch heART Works (pathheartworks.org) during the pandemic to share positive feelings of beauty and comfort through art therapy, focusing on rehab centers and nursing homes. We have numerous clients throughout the area and were recently approached by the local Penn Medicine facility to volunteer at an Oncology Holiday Event in collaboration with the Southern New Jersey Advocacy and Community Outreach Council. As I coordinated events, managed inventory, and fostered intimate connections with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s patients, I became curious about other ways debilitating diseases can be treated besides art, which led me to discover the world of new drug research and development. My newfound enthusiasm motivated me to conduct summer research at a structural biology lab at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where I gained insight into the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins and started my drug development project focusing on the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). I investigated whether a mutation causing constituent activation can rescue PAH functionality from PKU-inducing patient mutations and used molecular and protein lab technology to establish clones and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural significance of a novel cation-pi interaction and its effect on the enzyme’s mechanistic conformational selection model. As I conducted my research, I became curious as to how new drugs are tested and delivered to the real people who need them once they are developed, which introduced me to the managerial aspect of drug implementation in the business world. Upon further investigation, I realized that there are several stages in a drug’s lifecycle, from R&D to market introduction, and that effective management skills are equally as important as a sophisticated understanding of medicine to successfully conduct clinical trials. This epiphany ignited my entrepreneurial mindset from competing in regional, state, and international DECA competitions in the “Entrepreneurship Series'' event, which involved identifying venture opportunities to take the initiative necessary to execute a thriving business. Today, I aspire to become the Chief Executive Officer of a pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Medicines remain inaccessible for many worldwide due to companies in the industry prioritizing financial gain, but the combined knowledge of both the complex life sciences and essential management skills will enable me to lead an efficient team in drug development and clinical trials while also optimizing supply chain operations, implementing risk management strategies, and negotiating favorable partnerships grounded in cost-effectiveness and equitable distribution with healthcare providers and insurers. I believe exploring the intersection between medicine and business will allow me to rally for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow.
    GUTS- Olivia Rodrigo Fan Scholarship
    Ah, the teenage years, a rollercoaster of emotions and self-reflection! This lyric cuts straight to the heart of adolescent struggles. It's like asking, "When am I gonna stop being a pretty young thing to guys?" from Olivia Rodrigo’s “Teenage Dream”. Adolescents grapple with the desire to be recognized for their inner qualities, not just their outward appearance. It's a time when the pursuit of genuine connection and self-identity clashes with the superficial judgments of society. Adolescence is a period characterized by physical changes, peer influence, and societal standards that impact one's self-esteem. Teenagers often feel the pressure to conform to beauty ideals, struggling with body image issues and a relentless desire to be attractive to others. The lyric reflects the anxiety of not being taken seriously or valued for one's character and intellect. Furthermore, this lyric highlights the gender dynamics that play a significant role in the teenage experience. Young women, in particular, may feel objectified and reduced to their physical appearance, leading to a constant battle for respect and recognition beyond their looks. It's a plea for acknowledgment as a person, not just an object of desire. The lyric also touches on the question of time, emphasizing the urgency teenagers feel to transition into adulthood and be seen for more than just their youthful appearance. Adolescents grapple with the looming uncertainty of the future, yearning for the day when they can escape the confines of being perceived as mere eye candy and be valued for their thoughts, aspirations, and contributions to society. Adolescence is a period of self-discovery and identity formation. Teenagers are navigating through a maze of self-awareness, trying to understand who they are and who they want to become. The lyric reflects the teenage longing for self-actualization, the desire to be recognized for their uniqueness, and the struggle to break free from societal molds. The challenges of adolescence are further compounded by the complexities of relationships and peer interactions. Teenagers often find themselves entangled in the web of social expectations, struggling to balance their aspirations with the need for social acceptance. The lyric speaks to the dilemma of wanting to be more than just eye candy to peers, to be appreciated for one's personality and not just physical appearance. In conclusion, the lyric, "When am I gonna stop being a pretty young thing to guys?" resonates deeply with the teenage experience. It captures the essence of adolescence, a time of self-discovery, self-acceptance, and the quest to be recognized for one's true self. It reflects the challenges of navigating societal expectations, the desire to break free from objectification, and the yearning to transition into adulthood, where one can be valued for their character, intellect, and individuality. Adolescence is a tumultuous journey, and this lyric beautifully encapsulates the emotions and struggles that come with it.
    Once Upon a #BookTok Scholarship
    Creating my dream bookshelf inspired by #BookTok is a rollercoaster of literary adventures! Let's dive into this with gusto. First up, we have "The Song of Achilles" by Madeline Miller. This book is a beautiful reimagining of the legendary love story between Achilles and Patroclus. It's so emotionally resonant that reading it is like catching all the feelings in the world. The #BookTok community went wild for its lyrical prose and swoon-worthy romance. Now, let's talk about "Six of Crows" by Leigh Bardugo. This one's a heist fantasy novel that's as thrilling as a rollercoaster ride. The morally ambiguous characters and the darkly atmospheric setting of Ketterdam have got everyone talking and theorizing. The #BookTok debates and discussions on this book are as epic as the heists themselves! "The Midnight Library" by Matt Haig deserves a special spot on my bookshelf. It's a thought-provoking exploration of regrets and the infinite possibilities of life. #BookTok readers have shared their personal experiences and how this book has inspired them to reflect on their own lives. And of course, we can't forget "Circe" by Madeline Miller. It's like a literary enchantment that's bewitched the #BookTok world with its lush storytelling and empowering themes. Circe's journey from outcast to formidable sorceress is a tale that resonates deeply with readers. Adding a touch of intensity, I'd place "A Little Life" by Hanya Yanagihara on my bookshelf. It's a poignant exploration of friendship, trauma, and the enduring human spirit. The conversations surrounding this book on #BookTok are as profound as the novel itself, delving into the complexities of the characters' lives. Last but not least, "The Silent Patient" by Alex Michaelides. This psychological thriller has set the #BookTok community abuzz with its mind-bending plot twists. Readers share theories, and reactions, and engage in thrilling discussions, making it an exhilarating experience. These books have not only influenced my reading choices but have also united the #BookTok community in passionate conversations. "The Song of Achilles" is a heartstring-pulling masterpiece that tugs at your emotions, and "Six of Crows" is like a heist you never want to end. "The Midnight Library" is a deep dive into life's what-ifs, while "Circe" casts a spell on your imagination. "A Little Life" takes you on an emotional rollercoaster, and "The Silent Patient" is a twisty, mind-bending thriller that'll leave you saying, "OMG!" They've kindled a love for literature and created a virtual book club of readers who can't get enough of exploring the diverse worlds these titles offer. Happy reading!
    McClendon Leadership Award
    Leadership, in my view, transcends the mere act of guiding a group; it's an unwavering passion that I discovered during the challenging times of the pandemic. It was a period that revealed the resilience of seniors and patients in rehab centers and the profound healing power of art. This journey led to the creation of "Patch heART Works," a project close to my heart. My mother, an artist, instilled in me not only a love for creativity but also a way to find solace in art during stressful moments. As the pandemic isolated us and limited social interactions, I witnessed the potential of art to rebuild our community's connections, and this realization became my driving force. Our journey commenced with humble beginnings, organizing craft workshops and embellishing rehabilitation centers with seasonal artwork. The joy we brought to the elderly residents was palpable, even in the face of adversity. We firmly believe that art has the remarkable ability to brighten anyone's day, transcending backgrounds and circumstances. Whether we were coloring quilt blankets or crafting whimsical doughnut wall decorations, the atmosphere was always filled with laughter and contagious positivity. Our ambitions soon outgrew the confines of a single nursing home. Collaborating with the local library, we initiated workshops that drew participants from all corners of the township. Crafting sessions and music provided a therapeutic escape from the day's stresses, fostering not only creativity but also deep, meaningful relationships. Innovation became our guiding star. We consistently sought novel ideas, from designing folding watermelon fans for senior citizens to crafting intricate 3D models of traditional Korean porcelain with residents at the Laurel Brook Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center. Our commitment to adapt and evolve was unwavering. We desired to impact a diverse spectrum of individuals, spanning from children and seniors to the dedicated community members who selflessly serve our community. To this end, we adorned the mayor's office with exquisite paper flowers, signifying our ability to flexibly adapt and contribute to diverse environments. The apex of our journey was marked by the prestigious Richard C. Goodwin-Josiah DuBois Humanitarian Award, a recognition of our unwavering commitment to moral and ethical principles. This accolade not only boosted our visibility but also served as a testament to the transformative power of art. Through Patch heART Works, I am dedicated to spreading the healing influence of art therapy and the importance of giving back through one's talents. This journey has taught me that even the smallest actions have the potential to address the most significant issues—one patch at a time.
    Reasons To Be - In Memory of Jimmy Watts
    My inspiration for founding "Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org)" was deeply influenced by my experiences witnessing senior citizens and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's in rehab centers and nursing homes struggling to stay positive during the pandemic. Additionally, my personal experiences with art and my artist mother's influence have been essential in shaping my perspective. Art has been a constant creative outlet for me, helping me relieve stress and find joy. As the pandemic limited social interactions, I realized that art had the power to reconnect the community. We began with small initiatives, offering craft workshops and decorating rehabilitation and healthcare centers. Our efforts brought cheer and optimism to senior citizens even in challenging circumstances. We believe that art has the potential to brighten someone's day, regardless of their background or situation. From creating quilt blankets to making doughnut wall decorations, our lives were enriched by the happiness and laughter that radiated from everyone involved. Before long, I expanded my vision beyond a single nursing home. I collaborated with the local public library, organizing events like poinsettia flower decorating workshops for the holidays and Mother's Day flower bouquet-making activities for kids and teens. These gatherings allowed people from different parts of the township to come together, share conversations, and find solace in the act of crafting while enjoying music. Innovation was a key part of our journey. We constantly explored new activities, whether it was making folding watermelon fans for the senior citizens at the Residence at Voorhees during the summer or creating 3-dimensional models of traditional Korean porcelain with the residents at the Laurel Brook Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center using clear plastic sheets. Our goal was to continually expand our offerings to the community. We aimed not only to reach kids and senior citizens but also to show appreciation to the hardworking community members who often go unnoticed. We achieved this by decorating the township mayor's office with beautiful paper flowers, an experience that was inspiring and allowed us to connect with municipal workers. My efforts with Patch heART Works were recognized when I received the $2,000 First Prize Richard C. Goodwin-Josiah DuBois Humanitarian Award from the local Esther Raab Holocaust Museum and Goodwin Education Center. This honor provided me with press exposure, and I was featured on the front page of the township newspaper titled "Art from the heART." Through Patch heART Works, my mission is to continue spreading the benefits of art therapy and to promote the values of giving back through one's talents, as even small actions can make a significant impact—one patch at a time.
    Harry Potter and the Sorting Hat Scholarship
    If I were to dive headfirst into the magical world of Harry Potter, I'd bet my bottom Galleon that I'd be donning the blue and bronze of Ravenclaw. In this essay, I'll unravel the magic behind my choice. Picture me stepping into the enchanting realm of Harry Potter. The sorting hat would barely touch my head before shouting, "Ravenclaw!" Why? Because this house is all about brains, wit, and creativity – and you better believe I'm all in on those traits. Rowena Ravenclaw, the house's founder, had it right. I was a bookworm, whether it was indulging myself in classic literature, engrossing myself in science fiction novels, or losing myself in epic historical wizarding tales like Harry Potter (one of my all-time favorites). I'm all about the pursuit of knowledge. Curiosity? I've got it in spades, just like the coolest Ravenclaws out there. But Ravenclaw is more than just being smart. It's about embracing your unique self and expressing your inner magic. For me, that means immersing myself in the world of magical music, art, and literature. Creativity and imagination are my Patronuses, and I reckon Ravenclaw's the perfect place to nurture them. The house's symbol is the eagle, a creature known for its sharp vision and insight. Well, I'm like that eagle, keeping a keen eye out for answers to tricky problems. I could spend hours – maybe even more – on puzzles, riddles, and brain teasers. Ravenclaw's the perfect spot for me to show off my intellectual prowess. And let's not forget my unwavering love for libraries and the pursuit of wisdom. The Hogwarts library, with its shelves stacked high with enchanted books, would be my playground. I find solace among the pages of magical tomes, and I'd be over the moon to uncover the secrets hidden within the Hogwarts library, just like a true-blue Ravenclaw. It's also important to note that Ravenclaw values individuality. While the house is often associated with bookish and introverted qualities, it also cherishes uniqueness. I believe that my individuality and the values I hold dear would be respected and appreciated within the house. Ravenclaw's motto, "Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure," suggests a deep respect for intellectual diversity and the recognition that every individual has unique strengths. In conclusion, I firmly believe that I would be sorted into Ravenclaw at Hogwarts. The house's emphasis on wisdom, learning, creativity, and individuality aligns with my values and attributes. My insatiable curiosity, love for the arts, problem-solving skills, and passion for learning makes me a perfect fit for the house that Rowena Ravenclaw founded. While the Sorting Hat's ultimate decision would be based on my innermost qualities, I can't help but feel that the bronze and blue Ravenclaw would be a natural match for my personality and aspirations. In Ravenclaw, I would find a community that values not only the pursuit of knowledge but also the celebration of each individual's unique journey of discovery.
    Maida Brkanovic Memorial Scholarship
    Winner
    I was fortunate enough to have embraced my cultural heritage from a young age as a Korean American with immigrant parents, attending Korean school and acquiring fluency in the language by speaking Korean at home. The Korean School of Southern New Jersey (KSSNJ) allowed me to interact with fellow Korean American peers and teachers, and I learned about the importance of speaking out against injustice and showing compassion, drawing inspiration from Korean politician and independence activist Kim Gu. Kim Gu was an integral leader in the Korean independence movement against Japanese colonial rule from 1910 to 1945, participating in the revolutionary March 1st movement and founding the Korean Liberation Army, which engaged in guerrilla warfare against Japanese forces. Kim Gu endured constant surveillance, harassment, and numerous assassination attempts by Japanese colonial authorities, who perceived him as a threat to their dominion over Korea. Learning about this important period in Korean history deeply moved me, inspiring me to embrace the values and principles of Kim Gu as a first-generation Korean American. My role as a traditional percussion leader and performer has highlighted my desire to open the eyes of audiences of all races and backgrounds to our cultural heritage through the power of music. Our percussion team has been honored to participate in numerous events and competitions, one of which was the 2021 Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage (AAPI) Festival, showcasing the rich cultural diversity of the Asian American community. Through our performances, we fostered understanding, appreciation, and unity among different cultures, promoting the values of inclusivity and respect. I founded “Patch heART Works” during the global pandemic last year as a way to channel my passion for art to provide a source of joy, peace, and healing to those who may lack the support they need. Although we started small, with my sister and I instructing monthly art classes for senior citizens and hanging up wall decorations at the Laurel Brook Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center, we quickly gained new members who shared our vision. We had the honor of decorating the Cherry Hill Township Mayor Angulo's office and hosted multiple arts and crafts activities at the Cherry Hill public library for children and teens. These activities were designed to inspire creativity, reduce stress, and promote social connection among the participants. Our activities have consistently been met with positive feedback from participants. Many of the senior citizens we worked with appreciated the opportunity to make crafts and enjoy the wall decorations, and we received admiration and praise from parents who brought their kids to the library, even asking if we would be willing to host arts and crafts activities at youth group events and birthday parties. I am grateful for the opportunity and privilege to give back to my community through my love for art because it’s “just what a human being should do”. I am also an instrumental performer for the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization. I had the privilege of bringing joy and comfort to the elderly residents through my music. Through these concerts, I have witnessed firsthand the positive impact that music can have on the emotional well-being of people. Being part of the Edelweiss Ensemble has allowed me to combine my passion for music with my desire to make a difference in the lives of others, fostering a sense of community and connection that is truly invaluable. I also tutored teens in science, reading, and math, which demonstrates my unwavering dedication to their educational growth and success. I also invested time and effort into preparing engaging lessons and tailored learning materials, ensuring that their specific needs were met. Moreover, compassion and kindness have been at the core of my interactions with these young students. Understanding the challenges they face in their academic journey, I approached our sessions with empathy and patience. I have strived to act as an approachable mentor and role model by creating a safe and supportive environment where they felt comfortable asking questions, expressing their difficulties, and seeking guidance. By showing genuine care and understanding, I aimed to nurture their self-confidence and motivate them to overcome obstacles. By actively engaging in these activities, I have worked to embody Kim Gu’s moral and ethical principles in my community. Through my dedication to speaking out against injustice as a first-generation student, I have found the importance of cultural preservation through traditional percussion performance and promoting compassion through Patch heART Works, the Edelweiss Ensemble, and P2P. I strive to contribute to a more inclusive and understanding society in my community.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    I plan on applying to the Vagelos Life Sciences & Management (LSM) dual degree program at the University of Pennsylvania, which integrates the Colleges of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School to provide an interdisciplinary education between scientific innovation and business. Through working as a paid student researcher at the Perelman School of Medicine, I gained insight into the structural, biochemical, and biophysical properties of proteins and how even minor mutations can destroy their functionality. I conducted a solo project investigating the structural properties of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase that causes the congenital metabolic disorder phenylketonuria (PKU). As I recorded my findings, presented in a journal club, and drafted research reports, simply knowing that my work would contribute to treating PKU was transforming my dream of becoming a drug development researcher into a reality. I aspire to establish my own pharmaceutical company capable of not only developing treatments for incurable diseases like PKU but also ensuring their safety and widespread availability. Global access to medicine is barred by companies appealing to the financially advantaged, making drugs inaccessible to the vast majority. By having an in-depth understanding of both the complex scientific nature and essential managerial aspect of developing, testing, and marketing drugs, I seek to lead an efficient team in clinical R&D while also optimizing quality assurance, budgeting, and subject recruitment & retention. While I currently spread art therapy through my organization patchheartworks.org, LSM will allow me to advocate for universal access to life-changing therapies for a better tomorrow. This scholarship will not only aid me in my studies in college but also my musical journey. Throughout high school, I worked extensively through hours of practicing and rehearsals to make regional, state, and national-level honor ensembles. Through an audition, I was placed as the concertmaster of the All South Jersey Honor Ensemble and was also selected as a Bb clarinetist for the All Eastern Honor Ensemble, where I received a generous full tuition scholarship ($700+) by the Cherry Hill High School East Music Boosters, as I was the only student who qualified from my high school. Through this incredible residential experience in Rochester, NY, I was able to connect and make phenomenal music with the best musicians on the East Coast, as well as perform at the renowned Eastman Theatre, an unforgettable experience made possible because of the scholarship I received. I was highly involved with my high school’s jazz band, having won a “Best Soloist” medal for clarinet 4 times at Cavalcade of Bands jazz festivals around the Philadelphia region. I also participated in the symphony orchestra as the principal clarinetist, playing numerous solos in pieces such as Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 8. I was also awarded a $795 scholarship to the high school summer music band camp program at the University of Pennsylvania by submitting my solo performance feature of “Portrait of Sidney Bechet” at my high school’s spring concert. Outside of school, I share my musical talents with the community through many mediums, such as participating in monthly performances for senior citizens at nursing homes through the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization based in Cherry Hill. I am also the Outreach Director of East Musicians on Call (EMC), a student-run club aimed at benefiting local communities with music. Through EMC, I have participated in numerous community benefit concerts and events in support of Project Crescendo, a fundraiser that supports the funding for instruments and rentals for local elementary/middle school music programs. Whether it is music or one's academic pursuits, financial barriers should never get in the way of education.
    Walking In Authority International Ministry Scholarship
    My inspiration for founding “Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org)” was heavily influenced by my combination of witnessing struggling senior citizens and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s in rehab centers and nursing homes struggling to stay positive during the pandemic and my personal experiences of joy and healing with art. My artist mother’s work and lessons provided me with a constant creative outlet and the ability to relieve my day of stress. As the pandemic hit and social interaction became limited, I realized the potential art had to reconnect the community. We started small by instructing craft workshops and decorating rehabilitation & healthcare centers with elaborate spring flowers, refreshing summer beaches, vibrant autumn leaves, and playful winter snowmen. The senior citizens were always cheerful and optimistic, even in the bleak conditions we were in. Masked up, we quickly gained new members who shared our vision. We believe that art can make someone’s day brighter, regardless of the background or situation. From coloring quilt blankets to evoke warm feelings to making tasty doughnut wall decorations, our lives were brightened by all of the cheer and environment of laughter that emitted from every single person there. Before we knew it, I was starting to think beyond the scope of just one nursing home. That was when I reached out to my local public library where we hosted a poinsettia flower decorating workshop for the holidays and a Mother’s Day Flower Bouquet-making activity for kids and teens. It was incredible seeing people from all over the township gather for a special hour of talking and enjoying the peace of crafts while listening to vibing music, allowing the day’s stresses to wash away. The respect for not only each other but the time we had in fostering those valuable relationships was exhilarating. It wasn’t like we were reusing the same activities either. Innovating was a huge part of the process, whether it was looking up how to make folding watermelon fans during the summer months for the senior citizens at the Residence at Voorhees or using clear plastic sheets to create 3-dimensional models of traditional Korean porcelain with the residents at the Laurel Brook Rehabilitation & Healthcare center. There were always new activities to plan and new venues to expand further to the community. We wanted our crafts and artwork to resonate with not just kids and senior citizens, but also the hard-working and serving community members who do so much for us for little in return, which we did by decorating the township mayor’s office with beautiful paper flowers. The experience was inspiring, greeting the mayor’s secretary and other workers in the municipality. After hanging the wall decorations, I felt a sense of accomplishment in our ability to be flexible and adapt to situations that required our artistic finesse. Finally came the blossoming of Patch heART Works to its fullest potential. After submitting an essay discussing my community efforts and impact, I was awarded the $2,000 First Prize Richard C. Goodwin-Josiah DuBois Humanitarian Award by the local Esther Raab Holocaust Museum and Goodwin Education Center for carrying out the moral and ethical principles of Holocaust humanitarian hero Josiah DuBois. This leverage allowed me to gain press exposure, featuring me on the front page of the township newspaper titled “Art from the heART”. Through Patch heART Works, I want to continue to not only spread art therapy to those who may need it but to champion the values of giving back through talents, because even the smallest actions can fix the biggest of problems. One patch at a time.
    DRIVE an IMPACT Today Scholarship
    As someone who witnessed struggling patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson’s in rehab centers and nursing homes during the pandemic, the feeling of hopelessness was all too familiar. What could be done to support and comfort those who needed it? Although I was lost for a long time, founding “Patch heART Works (patchheartworks.org)” provided me with the DETERMINATION to bring art therapy to the masses. We started small by instructing craft workshops and decorating rehabilitation & healthcare centers with elaborate spring flowers, refreshing summer beaches, vibrant autumn leaves, and playful winter snowmen. The senior citizens we worked with were delightful, always cheerful and optimistic, even in the bleak conditions we were in. Masked up, we quickly gained new members who shared our vision. To us, we believe that art has the quality of EQUALITY to make someone’s day brighter, regardless of the background or situation. From coloring quilt blankets to evoke warm feelings to making tasty doughnut wall decorations, our lives were brightened by all of the cheer and environment of laughter that emitted from every single person there. Before we knew it, I was starting to think beyond the scope of just one nursing home. That was when I reached out to my local public library where we hosted a poinsettia flower decorating workshop for the holidays and a Mother’s Day Flower Bouquet-making activity for kids and teens. It was incredible seeing people from all over the township gather for a special hour of talking and enjoying the peace of crafts while listening to vibing music, allowing the day’s stresses to wash away. The RESPECT for not only each other but the time we had in fostering these valuable relationships proved to be exhilarating for me. It wasn’t like we were reusing the same activities either. INNOVATING was a huge part of the process whether it was looking up how to make folding watermelon fans during the summer months for the senior citizens at the Residence at Voorhees or using clear plastic sheets to create 3-dimensional models of traditional Korean porcelain with the residents at the Laurel Brook Rehabilitation & Healthcare center. There were always new activities to plan and new venues to expand further to the community. A VERSATILE opportunity we had was when we decorated our township mayor’s office with beautiful flowers. We wanted our presence felt throughout the area, celebrating our crafts and artwork with more than just kids and senior citizens, but also for the hard-working and serving community members who do so much for us for little in return. The experience was inspiring, greeting the mayor’s secretary and other workers in the municipality. After hanging the wall decorations, I felt a sense of accomplishment in our ability to be flexible and adapt to situations that required our artistic finesse. Finally came the NURTURING of Patch heART Works to its fullest potential. After submitting an essay discussing my community efforts and the impact I was making, I was awarded the $2,000 First Prize Richard C. Goodwin-Josiah DuBois Humanitarian Award by the local Esther Raab Holocaust Museum and Goodwin Education Center for carrying out the moral and ethical principles of Holocaust humanitarian hero Josiah DuBois. This leverage allowed me to gain press exposure, even being featured on the front page of the township newspaper titled “Art from the heART”. Through Patch heART Works, I want to continue to not only spread art therapy to those who may need it but to champion the values of giving back through talents, because even the smallest actions can fix the biggest of problems. One patch at a time.
    I Can Do Anything Scholarship
    Cardiologist, entrepreneur, humanitarian, proud Korean-American, and avid musician dedicated to cultural empowerment and benefiting communities by advocating for universal access to life-changing therapies and infusing warmth and empathy with the logical realm of science and technology.
    Aspiring Musician Scholarship
    The first thing that intrigued me about the clarinet in fourth grade was its shiny silver keys and buttons that all clicked and clacked to make the most wonderful sound. And of course, the fact that Squidward played it made the sleek woodwind instrument no less appealing. Throughout my musical journey since then, I had no shortage of incredible opportunities to explore the delicate intricacies of musical works, as well as the memories I made with the network of people I met along the way. Throughout middle school and high school, I worked extensively through hours of practicing and rehearsals to make regional, state, and national-level honor ensembles. Through an audition, I was placed as the concertmaster of the All South Jersey Honor Ensemble and was also selected as a Bb clarinetist for the All Eastern Honor Ensemble as the only student from my high school. Through this incredible residential experience in Rochester, NY, I was able to connect and make phenomenal music with the best musicians on the East Coast, as well as perform at the renowned Eastman Theatre. One such experience that still resonates with me from All Eastern and has shaped the way I view not only music but life as a whole was listening to Dr. Peter Boonshaft, an esteemed music educator, conductor, and author who talked to the ensemble as a guest speaker. He delved into a captivating speech discussing 8 personal anecdotes tied to a random object, such as “old man” or “barge”. While they seemed nonsensical at first, each word was connected to a lesson that inspired us to embrace the power of music and the impact it can have on our lives. One story he recalled involved his experience conducting a high school festival in “the single statistically documented poorest place in America”, where the students used makeshift instruments made of wires, rubber bands, and duct tape. Overwhelmed with guilt, he realized his privilege in not having to endure hardships like using an outhouse or having dirt floors as a third of the residents did. Before the concert, he read a wooden sign on the wall that said "Today, this day, I will give everything I have, for anything I keep, I will have lost forever." These words brought him to tears, realizing that true wealth lay in the students' unwavering work ethic and commitment to giving their best in every moment. This experience transformed Dr. Boonshaft's life, compelling him to give his all in everything he did, music or otherwise. As Dr. Boonshaft moved on to the next object, I felt a sudden lump in my throat. The words on the wooden sign left a lasting impression on me, reshaping my approach not only to practicing music but to life itself. Dr. Boonshaft's monologue revealed his expertise, accomplishments, and dedication to educating not just exceptional musicians, but motivated and brilliant human beings. It was through experiences like this that music had such a profound impact on my life. Inspired by Dr. In Boonshaft's words, I decided to share my musical talents with the community through several mediums, such as participating in monthly performances or senior citizens at nursing homes through the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization based in Cherry Hill. I was also the Outreach Director for a school club called East Musicians on Call (EMC), where I participated in numerous community benefit concerts and events in support of Project Crescendo, a fundraiser that supports the funding for instruments and rentals for local elementary/middle school music programs.
    Bright Lights Scholarship
    As an ambitious student aspiring to make a positive impact in healthcare and serving the community, I plan to apply to the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, and Princeton University to enhance and nurture my vision. All three institutions not only serve as vibrant hubs for brilliant minds worldwide united by a relentless work ethic and deep commitment to their craft and offer the strongest pre-med programs in the country, but they also open the doors to endless opportunities to conduct groundbreaking research, collaborate with renowned medical professionals, and network with like-minded peers who share my passion for medicine. UPenn especially is close to home and I have had numerous experiences of experiencing its campus, people, and limitless opportunities firsthand. I was inspired to pursue STEM from a young age by my father’s groundbreaking work with gene therapy, but my fascination with medicine and cardiology specifically ignited with the privilege of holding a cadaver heart at the Rowan University College of Osteopathic Medicine. The experience was humbling, and this newfound interest led me to research and write about Dr. Daniel Hale Williams for an essay competition, where I was honored with first place. Dr. Williams not only pioneered the first open heart surgery, but he also dedicated his life to inspiring change and challenging racial barriers as an African American in medicine. As a Korean-American with immigrant parents, I was deeply moved by both his medical accomplishments and legacy of equality, and I aspire to follow in his footsteps by pursuing cardiology to also make a meaningful impact in the community. This scholarship will not only aid me in my studies in college, but also in my musical journey. Throughout high school, I worked extensively through hours of practicing and rehearsals to make regional, state, and national level honor ensembles. Through an audition, I was placed as the concertmaster of the All South Jersey Honor Ensemble and was also selected as a Bb clarinetist for the All Eastern Honor Ensemble, where I received a generous full tuition scholarship ($700+) by the Cherry Hill High School East Music Boosters, as I was the only student who qualified from my high school. Through this incredible residential experience in Rochester, NY, I was able to connect and make phenomenal music with the best musicians on the East Coast, as well as perform at the renowned Eastman Theatre, an unforgettable experience made possible because of the scholarship I received. I was highly involved with my high school’s jazz band, having won a “Best Soloist” medal for clarinet 4 times at Cavalcade of Bands jazz festivals around the Philadelphia region. I also participated in the symphony orchestra as the principal clarinetist, playing numerous solos in pieces such as Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 8. I was also awarded a $795 scholarship to the high school summer music band camp program at the University of Pennsylvania by submitting my solo performance feature of “Portrait of Sidney Bechet” at my high school’s spring concert. Outside of school, I share my musical talents with the community through a number of mediums, such as participating in monthly performances or senior citizens at nursing homes through the Edelweiss Ensemble, a student-run music community service organization based in Cherry Hill. I am also the Outreach Director of East Musicians on Call (EMC), a student-run club aimed at benefiting local communities with music. Through EMC, I have participated in numerous community benefit concerts and events in support of Project Crescendo, a fundraiser that supports the funding for instruments and rentals for local elementary/middle school music programs.