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Ahmed Aden

1365

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1x

Finalist

Bio

From a young age, I wanted to work in healthcare. I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. Experiencing this had a cascade effect leading me to develop a passion for anesthesia. So, I have returned as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. With the scholarships I receive, I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines mentorship, research, and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations.

Education

Arkansas State University-Main Campus

Doctoral degree program (PhD, MD, JD, etc.)
2022 - 2025
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

GateWay Community College

Associate's degree program
2017 - 2018
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing

Upper Iowa University

Bachelor's degree program
2017 - 2022
  • Majors:
    • Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing
  • Not planning to go to medical school
  • Career

    • Dream career field:

      Medicine

    • Dream career goals:

      Leadership and education

    • ICU Nurse

      Valleywise Health Medical Center
      2020 – Present4 years

    Sports

    Basketball

    Junior Varsity
    2008 – 20102 years

    Research

    • Community Organization and Advocacy

      Women’s Health Clinic — Delivered educational materials in the English and Somali languages, answered questions from the audience, provided culturally appropriate materials, and explained it to the audience. The assigned task was Data Dissemination.
      2016 – 2019

    Arts

    • Present

    Public services

    • Volunteering

      Al-Rahma Islamic Center — Tutor
      2012 – 2021
    • Volunteering

      Al-Rahma Islamic Center — Youth Director
      2017 – 2019

    Future Interests

    Advocacy

    Politics

    Volunteering

    Philanthropy

    Entrepreneurship

    Youssef University's Muslim Scholarship Fund
    My Muslim identity has played a pivotal role in shaping both my personal values and my future goals. The principles of compassion, community, and service that are integral to my faith have inspired me to pursue a path that combines academic achievement with making a positive impact on society. As a Muslim, I have always felt a deep sense of duty to contribute to society and help those in need. My faith encourages me to seek knowledge and use it to make the world a better place. Receiving this scholarship would be a crucial step toward realizing my dreams. It would provide me with the financial boost necessary to complete my graduate degree, which would equip me with the skills and knowledge to create meaningful change in this world. From a young age, I wanted to work in healthcare. I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. Experiencing this had a cascade effect leading me to develop a passion for anesthesia. So, I have returned as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. In addition to this, my Muslim identity has helped me develop a robust sense of community and the importance of working together. If I were awarded this scholarship, it would provide me with the opportunity to participate in cross-cultural exchanges and gain knowledge from a variety of perspectives on view. This experience would not only enhance the value of my education, but it would also assist me in developing an awareness of other cultures that is essential for effectively addressing global concerns. Having this scholarship would allow me to connect with a network of mentors with goals and Islamic ideals similar to mine. Not only would this improve the quality of my academic experience, but it would also provide direction and ideas for long-lasting changes. In conclusion, my Muslim identity has deeply influenced my aspirations by instilling a strong sense of purpose and a commitment to social betterment. Receiving this scholarship would provide the necessary support to transform these aspirations into reality, enabling me to combine research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations.
    Dr. Ifeoma Ezebuiro Ezeobele Africans in Nursing Scholarship
    I was brought up in my first few years of life in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. There, I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia at the time. Experiencing this had a cascade effect leading me to develop a passion for anesthesia. My late grandmother has inspired me to go into the health field and to now return to graduate school as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. Through my training in nurse anesthesia, I have come to realize that this field is not diverse enough to be able to represent most communities. The United States is becoming more and more diverse, and by 2040, the population is expected to be primarily people of color (Gould et al., 2023). It, therefore, becomes increasingly important that the healthcare workforce represents the populations they serve. The expected growth of diverse populations shows how important it is to have a more diverse nursing workforce. People of color are, however, consistently underrepresented in nursing, especially at the graduate level and in the area of nurse anesthesia. Receiving this Scholarship would assist me in further diversifying the field of anesthesia, as I would like to be a mentor and a resource to my community. The American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology estimates that there is a significant under-representation of African Americans at 3% in the field of Nurse Anesthesia (Gould et al., 2023). My doctoral project aims to reach out to minority students and educate them about the CRNA profession with the goal of creating demand for anesthesia programs. I would be glad to share my written plan. If I receive this award, I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations. Sincerely, Ahmed Aden, Student Registered Nurse Anesthetist Reference Gould, W., Simmons, V. C., Damico, N. K., Hu, J., & Aroke, E. N. (2023, January). Addressing structural and systemic barriers in nurse anesthesia programs: Recommendation to eliminate the GRE and adopt holistic admissions. Nursing Outlook, 71(1), 101888. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2022.10.001
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    From a young age, I wanted to work in healthcare. I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. Experiencing this had a cascade effect leading me to develop a passion for anesthesia. So, I have returned as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. I have many reasons for what inspires me to excel and to succeed. I want to share one of those reasons. It is becoming more evident that the United States is becoming more and more diverse, and by 2040, the population is expected to be primarily people of color (Gould et al., 2023). The expected growth of diverse populations shows the importance of a more diverse nursing workforce. People of color are, however, consistently underrepresented in nursing, especially at the graduate level and in the area of nurse anesthesia. The American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology estimates that there is a significant under-representation of African Americans at 3% in the field of Nurse Anesthesia (Gould et al., 2023). The Institute of Medicine released the report Unequal Treatment, highlighting the fact that those who are racially and ethnically diverse, even those with equal levels of healthcare access, received lower quality care than white patients for many conditions (Gould et al., 2023). It is, therefore, becoming increasingly important that the healthcare workforce represents the populations they serve. If I receive this award, I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines mentorship, research, and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations. Receiving this Scholarship would assist me in further diversifying the field of anesthesia, as my doctoral project aims to reach out to minority students and educate them about the nurse anesthesia profession with the goal of creating demand for anesthesia programs. I would be glad to share my written plan. Sincerely Ahmed Aden Reference Gould, W., Simmons, V. C., Damico, N. K., Hu, J., & Aroke, E. N. (2023, January). Addressing structural and systemic barriers in nurse anesthesia programs: Recommendation to eliminate the GRE and adopt holistic admissions. Nursing Outlook, 71(1), 101888. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2022.10.001
    Social Change Fund United Scholarship
    From a young age, I wanted to work in healthcare. I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. Experiencing this had a cascade effect leading me to develop a passion for anesthesia. So, I have returned as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. The United States is becoming more and more diverse, and by 2040, the population is expected to be primarily people of color (Gould et al., 2023). The expected growth of diverse populations shows how important it is to have a more diverse nursing workforce. People of color are, however, consistently underrepresented in nursing, especially at the graduate level and in the area of nurse anesthesia. The Institute of Medicine released the report Unequal Treatment, highlighting the fact that those who are racially and ethnically diverse, even those with equal levels of healthcare access, received lower quality care than white patients for many conditions (Gould et al., 2023). Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important that the healthcare workforce represents the populations they serve. Receiving this Scholarship would assist me in further diversifying the field of anesthesia, as I would like to be a mentor and a resource to my community. The American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology estimates that there is a significant under-representation of African Americans at 3% in the field of Nurse Anesthesia (Gould et al., 2023). My doctoral project aims to reach out to minority students and educate them about the nurse anesthesia profession with the goal of creating demand for anesthesia programs. I would be glad to share my written plan. To address the main question, a utopian vision for the Black community would require building a society that acknowledges and responds to specific challenges and structural barriers that the Black community faces every day. I would work to make sure that mental health care is readily accessible, cost-effective, and culturally sensitive. Among these measures is an increase in the number of people from underrepresented groups who work in mental health. I would then address the root causes of mental health disparities by discussing systemic racism and discrimination. This includes working for more fair and equitable social policies and educational opportunities. I would recognize the diversity within the Black community and acknowledge the influence of culture, history, and identity on mental health. It's important to note that achieving a utopian vision for optimal mental health in the Black community requires a collective effort from all and an ongoing commitment. If I receive this award, I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations. Sincerely Ahmed Aden, Student Registered Nurse Anesthetist Reference https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36588044/
    Henry Bynum, Jr. Memorial Scholarship
    From a young age, I wanted to work in healthcare. As I grew up in northern Kenya, I remember losing my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. That’s where I developed my passion for anesthesia. So, I have returned as a full-time student to further my education in nursing to receive a Doctor of Nursing Practice in nurse anesthesia, and I am currently a Junior Nurse Anesthesia student. One of the greatest gift one can have is a sound support system. I was blessed to be around friends who challenged me, family who cheered me on, and nursing mentors who guided me throughout my journey. Having that support system has played an essential part in my perseverance during adversity. Seeking their guidance, advice, and emotional support has given me valuable perspective and help navigating challenging circumstances. The United States is becoming more and more diverse, and by 2040, the population is expected to be primarily people of color (Gould et al., 2023). It, therefore, becomes increasingly important that the healthcare workforce represents the populations they serve. The expected growth of diverse populations shows how important it is to have a more diverse nursing workforce. People of color are, however, consistently underrepresented in nursing, especially at the graduate level and in the area of nurse anesthesia. Through my anesthesia school training, I have come to realize that nurse anesthesia is a field that is not as diverse. Receiving this Scholarship would assist me in further diversifying the field of anesthesia, as I would like to be a mentor and a resource to my community. The American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology estimates that there is a significant under-representation of African Americans at 3% in the field of Nurse Anesthesia (Gould et al., 2023). My doctoral project aims to reach out to minority students and educate them about the CRNA profession with the goal of creating demand for anesthesia programs. I would be glad to share my written plan. If I receive this award, I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. This award will help me in taking out fewer loans and allow me to focus more on school and clinical rotations. Sincerely, Ahmed Aden, Student Registered Nurse Anesthetist Reference https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0029655422001762
    Dashanna K. McNeil Memorial Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my early years in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia's civil war. We ate when we could, usually twice and, upon occasion, once a day. We shared floor mattresses when available and seldomly slept on the floor. Even so, my parents never gave up. When I was five years old, we were able to resettle in the United States of America due to work my father had done for the United Nations. In middle school, I realized education would be the way for me if I were to honor the sacrifices my parents had made. I went on to graduate from high school. I graduated from a community college with an Associate's degree in arts and an Associate's degree in Applied Science in Nursing because it was more cost-effective for my family. While I worked full time as an ICU nurse, I continued my education and received my Bachelor's degree in Nursing. I want to go back to school and have been accepted into graduate school to become a doctorally prepared Nurse Anesthetist. One of the primary motivations for doing Nurse Anesthesia is partly due to the lack of anesthesia providers around the globe. Back home, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine in Kenya, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. For instance, I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So it has always been my lifelong goal to attain a degree in the field of anesthesia. If I were to receive this assistance, it would help pay for my doctoral program and allow me to better focus on my studies. Thank you.
    Grandmaster Nam K Hyong Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my early years in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia's civil war. We ate when we could, usually twice and, upon occasion, once a day. We shared floor mattresses when available and seldomly slept on the floor. Even so, my parents never gave up. When I was five years old, we were able to resettle in the United States of America due to work my father had done for the United Nations. In middle school, I realized education would be the way for me if I were to honor the sacrifices my parents had made. In Kenya, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. For instance, I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So it has always been my lifelong goal to attain a degree in the field of anesthesia. Moreover, I want to become a nurse anesthetist, more specifically, doctorally prepared, as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes in health care. Completing a doctorate program is a crucial step towards enhancing my practice as a nurse. In 2019 I was privileged to attend conferences relating to anesthesia. In fact, I was very fortunate to participate in the Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia Mentorship Program twice. The program provides mentorship to diverse students who want to enroll in anesthesia programs. Diverse nurse anesthetists provided tips on balancing family and finances, clinical preparation, surviving didactic courses, and being an exemplary student. I enjoyed information sessions presented by diverse faculty members, A few program directors, SRNAs, and CRNAs who gave insight into nurse anesthesia. I remember the airway simulation lab workshops that showcased the anesthesia machine, anesthesia techniques, types of intubation equipment, and more. This experience is one of the reasons I was able to determine my interest in anesthesia. Outside of nursing, I have also partaken in research partnering with the Refugee Womens' Health Clinic in Arizona. In addition, I have also been a Youth Director for two years and a teacher for ten at our local religious center. I have coordinated after school and weekend programs for the community and tutored children on STEM subjects. My long term goals are to continue serving the community and give back to those less fortunate in our country and those abroad. I want to end by saying I'm an ideal candidate for this scholarship as I can see myself being a student again. I'm able to make use of this scholarship to the fullest extent. These last few years, I have been able to get involved, do research, get licensed as a nurse, complete critical care nurse residency, retake some courses, complete my BSN degree, and achieve nursing certifications in a short amount of time. I have developed routine and productive study habits. Over the years, all I needed was a supportive family, a local coffee shop, and some iced coffee. In addition to that, I believe I am an ideal candidate because of my unique background. I am a health care provider who speaks three languages and understands many Arab and African cultures, which would be an addition to the culture and diversity in health care and the anesthesia community at large.
    Patrick Stanley Memorial Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my early years in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia's civil war. We ate when we could, usually twice and, upon occasion, once a day. We shared floor mattresses when available and seldomly slept on the floor. Even so, my parents never gave up. When I was five years old, we were able to resettle in the United States of America due to work my father had done for the United Nations. In middle school, I realized education would be the way for me if I were to honor the sacrifices my parents had made. I went on to graduate from high school. I graduated from a community college with an Associate's degree in arts and an Associates's degree in Applied Science in Nursing because it was more cost-effective for my family. While I worked full time as an ICU nurse, I continued my education and received my Bachelor's degree in Nursing. I have just applied for graduate school to become a doctorally prepared Nurse Anesthetist. One of the primary motivations for doing Nurse Anesthesia is partly due to the lack of anesthesia providers around the globe. Back home, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine in Kenya, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. For instance, I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So it has always been my lifelong goal to attain a degree in the field of anesthesia. If I were to receive this assistance, it would help pay for my doctoral program and allow me to better focus on my studies. Thank you.
    Noah Jon Markstrom Student Debt Paydown Grant
    I grew up babysitting my nieces and nephews all through grade school. When I decided to pursue a career in health care, I knew I wanted to work with pediatrics. I have worked in a pediatric burn clinic for over two years now. We take care of children with severe burns. Depending on the severity of the burn, children can stay for months, and we develop a special bond with every one of them. We pray for a good outcome. When we something as devastating as a burn and to see them progress and go home is what drives me to continue to do what I do. Seeing most of them go through many surgeries and not complain during physical therapy and nursing care shows me the resilience of pediatric patients. If I were to win this scholarship, it would help pay for some of my undergrad loans.
    Papi & Mamita Memorial Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my early years in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia’s civil war. We ate when we could, usually twice and, upon occasion, once a day. We shared floor mattresses when available and seldomly slept on the floor. Even so, my parents never gave up. When I was five years old, we were able to resettle in the United States of America due to work my father had done for the United Nations. In middle school, I realized education would be the way for me if I were to honor the sacrifices my parents had made. In Kenya, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. For instance, I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So it has always been my lifelong goal to attain a degree in the field of anesthesia. Moreover, I want to become a nurse anesthetist, more specifically, doctorally prepared, as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes in health care. Completing a doctorate program is a crucial step towards enhancing my practice as a nurse. In 2019 I was privileged to attend conferences relating to anesthesia. In fact, I was very fortunate to participate in the Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia Mentorship Program twice. The program provides mentorship to diverse students who want to enroll in anesthesia programs. Diverse nurse anesthetists provided tips on balancing family and finances, clinical preparation, surviving didactic courses, and being an exemplary student. I enjoyed information sessions presented by diverse faculty members, A few program directors, SRNAs, and CRNAs who gave insight into nurse anesthesia. I remember the airway simulation lab workshops that showcased the anesthesia machine, anesthesia techniques, types of intubation equipment, and more. This experience is one of the reasons I was able to determine my interest in anesthesia. Outside of nursing, I have also partaken in research partnering with the Refugee Womens' Health Clinic in Arizona. In addition, I have also been a Youth Director for two years and a teacher for ten at our local religious center. I have coordinated after school and weekend programs for the community and tutored children on STEM subjects. My long term goals are to continue serving the community and give back to those less fortunate in our country and those abroad. I want to end by saying I'm an ideal candidate for this scholarship as I can see myself being a student again. I'm able to make use of this scholarship to the fullest extent. These last few years, I have been able to get involved, do research, get licensed as a nurse, complete critical care nurse residency, retake some courses, complete my BSN degree, and achieve nursing certifications in a short amount of time. I have developed routine and productive study habits. Over the years, all I needed was a supportive family, a local coffee shop, and some iced coffee. In addition to that, I believe I am an ideal candidate because of my unique background. I am a health care provider who speaks three languages and understands many Arab and African cultures, which would be an addition to the culture and diversity in health care and the anesthesia community at large.
    Theresa Lord Future Leader Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my early years in a refugee camp in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia’s civil war. We ate when we could, usually twice and, upon occasion, once a day. We shared floor mattresses when available and seldomly slept on the floor. Even so, my parents never gave up. When I was five years old, we were able to resettle in the United States of America due to work my father had done for the United Nations. In middle school, I realized education would be the way for me if I were to honor the sacrifices my parents had made. In Kenya, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. For instance, I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So it has always been my lifelong goal to attain a degree in the field of anesthesia. Moreover, I want to become a nurse anesthetist, more specifically, doctorally prepared, as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes in health care. Completing a doctorate program is a crucial step towards enhancing my practice as a nurse. In 2019 I was privileged to attend conferences relating to anesthesia. In fact, I was very fortunate to participate in the Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia Mentorship Program twice. The program provides mentorship to diverse students who want to enroll in anesthesia programs. Diverse nurse anesthetists provided tips on balancing family and finances, clinical preparation, surviving didactic courses, and being an exemplary student. I enjoyed information sessions presented by diverse faculty members, A few program directors, SRNAs, and CRNAs who gave insight into nurse anesthesia. I remember the airway simulation lab workshops that showcased the anesthesia machine, anesthesia techniques, types of intubation equipment, and more. This experience is one of the reasons I was able to determine my interest in anesthesia. Outside of nursing, I have also partaken in research partnering with the Refugee Womens' Health Clinic in Arizona. In addition, I have also been a Youth Director for two years and a teacher for ten at our local religious center. I have coordinated after school and weekend programs for the community and tutored children on STEM subjects. My long term goals are to continue serving the community and give back to those less fortunate in our country and those abroad. I want to end by saying I’m an ideal candidate for this scholarship as I can see myself being a student again. I'm able to make use of this scholarship to the fullest extent. These last few years, I have been able to get involved, do research, get licensed as a nurse, complete critical care nurse residency, retake some courses, complete my BSN degree, and achieve nursing certifications in a short amount of time. I have developed routine and productive study habits. Over the years, all I needed was a supportive family, a local coffee shop, and some iced coffee. In addition to that, I believe I am an ideal candidate because of my unique background. I am a health care provider who speaks three languages and understands many Arab and African cultures, which would be an addition to the culture and diversity in health care and the anesthesia community at large.
    Melaninwhitecoats Podcast Annual Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my childhood in refugee camps in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia’s civil war. In Kenya, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. So going into anesthesia was a life long goal of mine. I am a health care provider who speaks three languages and understands many Arab and African cultures. I believe this would be an addition to the culture and diversity of the anesthesia and healthcare community at large. It has been documented that there are better patient outcomes when the nurse understands the culture or speaks the language of the patient. In healthcare, there is a discrepancy as far as having diverse providers be involved in patient care. There are different ethnicities and cultures. I think it is essential to have that be reflected in the type of providers that are there to talk to these patients. An anesthesia provider who shares a culture with them, speaks the same language or understands their background or where they came from is vital so that these patients feel at ease and can trust us. I am in a graduate nurse anesthesia program to prepare me to become a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist. As for my financial needs, The anesthesia program costs $85,000. My plan includes three layers. The first layer is my savings. I have an emergency savings account that is three months worth of expenses. I have a schools savings account of $30,000. The second layer is an actual formal contract with three of my siblings who pledged to loan me $2,500 a semester each for the three years. The third layer is to fill out scholarships, complete the FAFSA application, apply for Stafford loans or grad plus loans but judiciously. Grad plus loans usually have a higher interest rate. If I receive this scholarship, it will lighten the burden of school loans. I have been a Youth Director for two years and a teacher for ten, at our local religious center. I enjoy education and want to be an educator. Teaching is something that I will pursue within the next ten years. I have previously coordinated after school and weekend tutoring for children on STEM subjects. I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care in the next ten years. I want one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes and give back to those less fortunate in our country and those abroad.
    Pay It Forward CRNA Scholarship
    I have had a humble upbringing that began with spending my childhood in refugee camps in northern Kenya. During this period of my life, my parents' objective was to help us survive by fleeing Somalia’s civil war. In Kenya, there was no regulation or standardized way to safely practice medicine, especially back then. Performing surgeries without anesthesia was prevalent, which meant mortality rates were consistently high. I have personally lost my grandmother to a preventable complication due to the lack of safe obstetric anesthesia. I want to pay it forward as I wish my responsibility to go beyond providing just direct patient care. It is one that combines research and academic skills to identify new ways to improve patient outcomes. Outside of nursing, I have also been a Youth Director for two years and a teacher for ten, at our local religious center. I have coordinated after school and weekend tutoring for children on STEM subjects. My long term goals are to continue serving the community and give back to those less fortunate in our country and those abroad.