Black Students in Public Health Grant

Funded by
Dror Liebenthal
Learn more about the Donor
$1,000
1 winner
Open
Application Deadline
Nov 1, 2020
Winners Announced
Nov 30, 2020
Education Level
Undergraduate, Graduate
Eligibility Requirements
Ethnicity:
African-American
Ethnicity:
African-American

After Serena Williams gave birth to her daughter, Olympia, she almost died from a pulmonary embolism.

Since she had a history of blood clots, she knew immediately what was wrong, but her doctors didn’t believe her at first

Serena Williams is one of the greatest athletes of all time and a global inspiration, but in the healthcare system, her experience was far from unique.

Today, in 2020, doctors are more likely to evaluate Black patients’ pain as less than that of white patients with the same symptoms.

A stunning 40% of first- and second-year medical students believe myths of biological differences between Black patients and White patients, leading to chronic undertreatment of pain in Black patients.

Healthcare inequity in the Black community is a systemic problem, one that also manifests itself as a representation issue. Despite African-Americans making up 13.4% of the nation’s population, just 5% of physicians are Black.

Numerous studies show that patients of color both feel less safe with doctors than White patients, and also see improved health outcomes when they see Black doctors.

Addressing this problem will take dedication and collaboration across government, the public health sector, the education sector, and more. We need more Black people in public health (whether as physicians, policy-makers, or otherwise) who are passionate about meeting the needs of their communities and driving change. 

As one small part of this, the Black Students in Public Health Grant will be awarded to a Black undergraduate or graduate student pursuing public health.

Students are not required to be public health majors to apply. Candidates who intend to pursue a career across any area of public health are eligible. The winner will be chosen on the basis of their drive, and on the impact that additional support would have for them.

Thank you to Madison Ambroise and Nadia La Mar, who are both recent Bold.org scholarship winners and amazing Black students pursuing careers in public health. Madison and Nadia both inspired this grant and guided its direction through their invaluable feedback.

Diversity and Inclusion
Selection Criteria:
Impact, Drive
$1,000
1 winner
Open
Application Deadline
Nov 1, 2020
Winners Announced
Nov 30, 2020
Education Level
Undergraduate, Graduate

Scholarship application essay

Essay Topic

Please tell us a bit about yourself, why you’re pursuing public health, and what you plan to achieve with the help of your education.

500–1000 words

FAQ